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Title: Review of the algal biology program within the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts

Abstract

In 2010,when the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB) consortiumbegan, littlewas known about themolecular basis of algal biomass or oil production. Very fewalgal genome sequenceswere available and efforts to identify the best-producing wild species through bioprospecting approaches had largely stalled after the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program. This lack of knowledge included how reduced carbon was partitioned into storage products like triglycerides or starch and the role played bymetabolite remodeling in the accumulation of energy-dense storage products. Furthermore, genetic transformation and metabolic engineering approaches to improve algal biomass and oil yields were in their infancy. Genome sequencing and transcriptional profiling were becoming less expensive, however; and the tools to annotate gene expression profiles under various growth and engineered conditions were just starting to be developed for algae. It was in this context that an integrated algal biology program was introduced in the NAABB to address the greatest constraints limiting algal biomass yield. This review describes the NAABB algal biology program, including hypotheses, research objectives, and strategies to move algal biology research into the twenty-first century and to realize the greatest potential of algae biomass systems to produce biofuels.

Authors:
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Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1356499
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-125672
Journal ID: ISSN 2211-9264; 40890; BM0102030
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Algal Research; Journal Volume: 22
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Algal biology; Genomics; Proteomics; Lipid biosynthesis; NAABB; National Alliance for advanced biofuels and Bioproducts; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Unkefer, Clifford J., Sayre, Richard T., Magnuson, Jon K., Anderson, Daniel B., Baxter, Ivan, Blaby, Ian K., Brown, Judith K., Carleton, Michael, Cattolico, Rose Ann, Dale, Taraka, Devarenne, Timothy P., Downes, C. Meghan, Dutcher, Susan K., Fox, David T., Goodenough, Ursula, Jaworski, Jan, Holladay, Jonathan E., Kramer, David M., Koppisch, Andrew T., Lipton, Mary S., Marrone, Babetta L., McCormick, Margaret, Molnár, István, Mott, John B., Ogden, Kimberly L., Panisko, Ellen A., Pellegrini, Matteo, Polle, Juergen, Richardson, James W., Sabarsky, Martin, Starkenburg, Shawn R., Stormo, Gary D., Teshima, Munehiro, Twary, Scott N., Unkefer, Pat J., Yuan, Joshua S., and Olivares, José A.. Review of the algal biology program within the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.algal.2016.06.002.
Unkefer, Clifford J., Sayre, Richard T., Magnuson, Jon K., Anderson, Daniel B., Baxter, Ivan, Blaby, Ian K., Brown, Judith K., Carleton, Michael, Cattolico, Rose Ann, Dale, Taraka, Devarenne, Timothy P., Downes, C. Meghan, Dutcher, Susan K., Fox, David T., Goodenough, Ursula, Jaworski, Jan, Holladay, Jonathan E., Kramer, David M., Koppisch, Andrew T., Lipton, Mary S., Marrone, Babetta L., McCormick, Margaret, Molnár, István, Mott, John B., Ogden, Kimberly L., Panisko, Ellen A., Pellegrini, Matteo, Polle, Juergen, Richardson, James W., Sabarsky, Martin, Starkenburg, Shawn R., Stormo, Gary D., Teshima, Munehiro, Twary, Scott N., Unkefer, Pat J., Yuan, Joshua S., & Olivares, José A.. Review of the algal biology program within the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts. United States. doi:10.1016/j.algal.2016.06.002.
Unkefer, Clifford J., Sayre, Richard T., Magnuson, Jon K., Anderson, Daniel B., Baxter, Ivan, Blaby, Ian K., Brown, Judith K., Carleton, Michael, Cattolico, Rose Ann, Dale, Taraka, Devarenne, Timothy P., Downes, C. Meghan, Dutcher, Susan K., Fox, David T., Goodenough, Ursula, Jaworski, Jan, Holladay, Jonathan E., Kramer, David M., Koppisch, Andrew T., Lipton, Mary S., Marrone, Babetta L., McCormick, Margaret, Molnár, István, Mott, John B., Ogden, Kimberly L., Panisko, Ellen A., Pellegrini, Matteo, Polle, Juergen, Richardson, James W., Sabarsky, Martin, Starkenburg, Shawn R., Stormo, Gary D., Teshima, Munehiro, Twary, Scott N., Unkefer, Pat J., Yuan, Joshua S., and Olivares, José A.. Wed . "Review of the algal biology program within the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts". United States. doi:10.1016/j.algal.2016.06.002.
@article{osti_1356499,
title = {Review of the algal biology program within the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts},
author = {Unkefer, Clifford J. and Sayre, Richard T. and Magnuson, Jon K. and Anderson, Daniel B. and Baxter, Ivan and Blaby, Ian K. and Brown, Judith K. and Carleton, Michael and Cattolico, Rose Ann and Dale, Taraka and Devarenne, Timothy P. and Downes, C. Meghan and Dutcher, Susan K. and Fox, David T. and Goodenough, Ursula and Jaworski, Jan and Holladay, Jonathan E. and Kramer, David M. and Koppisch, Andrew T. and Lipton, Mary S. and Marrone, Babetta L. and McCormick, Margaret and Molnár, István and Mott, John B. and Ogden, Kimberly L. and Panisko, Ellen A. and Pellegrini, Matteo and Polle, Juergen and Richardson, James W. and Sabarsky, Martin and Starkenburg, Shawn R. and Stormo, Gary D. and Teshima, Munehiro and Twary, Scott N. and Unkefer, Pat J. and Yuan, Joshua S. and Olivares, José A.},
abstractNote = {In 2010,when the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB) consortiumbegan, littlewas known about themolecular basis of algal biomass or oil production. Very fewalgal genome sequenceswere available and efforts to identify the best-producing wild species through bioprospecting approaches had largely stalled after the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program. This lack of knowledge included how reduced carbon was partitioned into storage products like triglycerides or starch and the role played bymetabolite remodeling in the accumulation of energy-dense storage products. Furthermore, genetic transformation and metabolic engineering approaches to improve algal biomass and oil yields were in their infancy. Genome sequencing and transcriptional profiling were becoming less expensive, however; and the tools to annotate gene expression profiles under various growth and engineered conditions were just starting to be developed for algae. It was in this context that an integrated algal biology program was introduced in the NAABB to address the greatest constraints limiting algal biomass yield. This review describes the NAABB algal biology program, including hypotheses, research objectives, and strategies to move algal biology research into the twenty-first century and to realize the greatest potential of algae biomass systems to produce biofuels.},
doi = {10.1016/j.algal.2016.06.002},
journal = {Algal Research},
number = ,
volume = 22,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
  • In 2010,when the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB) consortium began, little was known about the molecular basis of algal biomass or oil production. Very few algal genome sequences were available and efforts to identify the best-producing wild species through bioprospecting approaches had largely stalled after the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program. This lack of knowledge included how reduced carbon was partitioned into storage products like triglycerides or starch and the role played by metabolite remodeling in the accumulation of energy-dense storage products. Furthermore, genetic transformation and metabolic engineering approaches to improve algal biomass and oilmore » yields were in their infancy. Genome sequencing and transcriptional profiling were becoming less expensive, however; and the tools to annotate gene expression profiles under various growth and engineered conditions were just starting to be developed for algae. It was in this context that an integrated algal biology program was introduced in the NAABB to address the greatest constraints limiting algal biomass yield. Our review describes the NAABB algal biology program, including hypotheses, research objectives, and strategies to move algal biology research into the twenty-first century and to realize the greatest potential of algae biomass systems to produce biofuels.« less
  • In 2010, when the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB) consortium began, little was known about the molecular basis of algal biomass or oil production. Very few algal genome sequences were available and efforts to identify the best-producing wild species through bioprospecting approaches had largely stalled after the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program. This lack of knowledge included how reduced carbon was partitioned into storage products like triglycerides or starch and the role played by metabolite remodeling in the accumulation of energy-dense storage products. Furthermore, genetic transformation and metabolic engineering approaches to improve algal biomass andmore » oil yields were in their infancy. Genome sequencing and transcriptional profiling were becoming less expensive, however; and the tools to annotate gene expression profiles under various growth and engineered conditions were just starting to be developed for algae. It was in this context that an integrated algal biology program was introduced in the NAABB to address the greatest constraints limiting algal biomass yield. Furthermore, this review describes the NAABB algal biology program, including hypotheses, research objectives, and strategies to move algal biology research into the twenty-first century and to realize the greatest potential of algae biomass systems to produce biofuels.« less
  • In 2010,when the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB) consortium began, little was known about the molecular basis of algal biomass or oil production. Very few algal genome sequences were available and efforts to identify the best-producing wild species through bioprospecting approaches had largely stalled after the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program. This lack of knowledge included how reduced carbon was partitioned into storage products like triglycerides or starch and the role played by metabolite remodeling in the accumulation of energy-dense storage products. Furthermore, genetic transformation and metabolic engineering approaches to improve algal biomass and oilmore » yields were in their infancy. Genome sequencing and transcriptional profiling were becoming less expensive, however; and the tools to annotate gene expression profiles under various growth and engineered conditions were just starting to be developed for algae. It was in this context that an integrated algal biology program was introduced in the NAABB to address the greatest constraints limiting algal biomass yield. Our review describes the NAABB algal biology program, including hypotheses, research objectives, and strategies to move algal biology research into the twenty-first century and to realize the greatest potential of algae biomass systems to produce biofuels.« less
    Cited by 7
  • The cultivation efforts within the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB) were developed to provide four major goals for the consortium, which included biomass production for downstream experimentation, development of new assessment tools for cultivation, development of new cultivation reactor technologies, and development of methods for robust cultivation. The NAABB consortium testbeds produced over 1500 kg of biomass for downstream processing. The biomass production included a number of model production strains, but also took into production some of the more promising strains found through the prospecting efforts of the consortium. Cultivation efforts at large scale are intensive andmore » costly, therefore the consortium developed tools and models to assess the productivity of strains under various environmental conditions, at lab scale, and validated these against scaled outdoor production systems. Two new pond-based bioreactor designs were tested for their ability to minimize energy consumption while maintaining, and even exceeding, the productivity of algae cultivation compared to traditional systems. Also, molecular markers were developed for quality control and to facilitate detection of bacterial communities associated with cultivated algal species, including the Chlorella spp. pathogen, Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus, which was identified in at least two test site locations in Arizona and New Mexico. Finally, the consortium worked on understanding methods to utilize compromised municipal wastewater streams for cultivation. In conclusion, this review provides an overview of the cultivation methods and tools developed by the NAABB consortium to produce algae biomass, in robust low energy systems, for biofuel production.« less
  • The cultivation efforts within the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB) were developed to provide four major goals for the consortium, which included biomass production for downstream experimentation, development of new assessment tools for cultivation, development of new cultivation reactor technologies, and development of methods for robust cultivation. The NAABB consortium testbeds produced over 1500 kg of biomass for downstream processing. The biomass production included a number of model production strains, but also took into production some of the more promising strains found through the prospecting efforts of the consortium. Cultivation efforts at large scale are intensive andmore » costly, therefore the consortium developed tools and models to assess the productivity of strains under various environmental conditions, at lab scale, and validated these against scaled outdoor production systems. Two new pond-based bioreactor designs were tested for their ability to minimize energy consumption while maintaining, and even exceeding, the productivity of algae cultivation compared to traditional systems. Also, molecular markers were developed for quality control and to facilitate detection of bacterial communities associated with cultivated algal species, including the Chlorella spp. pathogen, Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus, which was identified in at least two test site locations in Arizona and New Mexico. Finally, the consortium worked on understanding methods to utilize compromised municipal wastewater streams for cultivation. In conclusion, this review provides an overview of the cultivation methods and tools developed by the NAABB consortium to produce algae biomass, in robust low energy systems, for biofuel production.« less
    Cited by 6