skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: 3D Printing With Plant-Based Materials

Abstract

Oak Ridge National Laboratory is exploring large-scale 3D printing with renewable, plant-based materials.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1354726
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ORNL; PLANTS; 3D PRINTING; BAMBOO; POPLAR; FLAX; FEEDSTOCKS; PETROLEUM-DERIVED PRODUCTS; RECYCLE

Citation Formats

None. 3D Printing With Plant-Based Materials. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
None. 3D Printing With Plant-Based Materials. United States.
None. Thu . "3D Printing With Plant-Based Materials". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1354726.
@article{osti_1354726,
title = {3D Printing With Plant-Based Materials},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {Oak Ridge National Laboratory is exploring large-scale 3D printing with renewable, plant-based materials.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Apr 20 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Apr 20 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • Foams are, by nature, disordered materials studded with air pockets of varying sizes. Lack of control over the material’s architecture at the micrometer or nanometer scale can make it difficult to adjust the foam’s basic properties. But Eric Duoss and a team of Livermore researchers are using additive manufacturing to develop “smarter” silicone cushions. By architecting the structure at the micro scale, they are able to control macro-scale properties previously unachievable with foam materials.
  • Ames scientist, Igor Slowing, explains the 3D printing of catalytic devices in the lab.
  • Innovation in the design and manufacturing of wind power generation components continues to be critical to achieving our national renewable energy goals. As a result of this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program and Advanced Manufacturing Office are partnering with public and private organizations to apply additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, to the production of wind turbine blade molds.
  • Additive manufacturing is changing the way the world thinks about manufacturing and design. And here at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, it’s changing the way our scientists approach research and development. Today we’ll look around three of the additive manufacturing research labs on the Lawrence Livermore campus.
  • When building a wind turbine, you want to make it as tall as possible to capture stronger, faster winds aloft. But taller tower bases become too large to be transported over the road—a constraint that has kept average U.S. wind turbine heights at 80 meters for the last 10 years. A Lab-Corps project undertaken by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has found a potential solution: automated concrete manufacturing.