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Title: Integral field spectroscopy of the low-mass companion HD 984 B with the Gemini Planet Imager

Abstract

We present new observations of the low-mass companion to HD 984 taken with the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) as a part of the GPI Exoplanet Survey campaign. Images of HD 984 B were obtained in the J (1.12–1.3 μm) and H (1.50–1.80 μm) bands. Combined with archival epochs from 2012 and 2014, we fit the first orbit to the companion to find an 18 au (70-year) orbit with a 68% confidence interval between 14 and 28 au, an eccentricity of 0.18 with a 68% confidence interval between 0.05 and 0.47, and an inclination of 119° with a 68% confidence interval between 114° and 125°. To address the considerable spectral covariance in both spectra, we present a method of splitting the spectra into low and high frequencies to analyze the spectral structure at different spatial frequencies with the proper spectral noise correlation. Using the split spectra, we compare them to known spectral types using field brown dwarf and low-mass star spectra and find a best-fit match of a field gravity M6.5 ± 1.5 spectral type with a corresponding temperature of $${2730}_{-180}^{+120}$$ K. Photometry of the companion yields a luminosity of $$\mathrm{log}({L}_{\mathrm{bol}}$$/$${L}_{\odot })=-2.88\pm 0.07$$ dex with DUSTY models. Mass estimates, again from DUSTY models, find an age-dependent mass of 34 ± 1 to 95 ± 4 M Jup. Lastly, these results are consistent with previous measurements of the object.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [4]; ORCiD logo [5]; ORCiD logo [6];  [3]; ORCiD logo [7];  [8]; ORCiD logo [9];  [10];  [11]; ORCiD logo [12];  [5]; ORCiD logo [13]; ORCiD logo [14]; ORCiD logo [8]; ORCiD logo [15];  [3]; ORCiD logo [16] more »; ORCiD logo [17]; ORCiD logo [14];  [18];  [3]; ORCiD logo [19];  [14]; ORCiD logo [8];  [11]; ORCiD logo [20]; ORCiD logo [21]; ORCiD logo [22]; ORCiD logo [23]; ORCiD logo [24];  [7];  [25]; ORCiD logo [26];  [7];  [26]; ORCiD logo [25]; ORCiD logo [27]; ORCiD logo [28];  [25]; ORCiD logo [26]; ORCiD logo [12]; ORCiD logo [26];  [18];  [20];  [29]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [25];  [30]; ORCiD logo [16] « less
  1. Univ. of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Canada)
  2. Univ. of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Canada); National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC (Canada)
  3. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
  4. SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)
  5. Univ. de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada)
  6. SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)
  7. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  8. Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)
  9. Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)
  10. Subaru Telescope, Hilo, HI (United States)
  11. Univ. Grenoble Alpes/CNRS, Grenoble (France)
  12. Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)
  13. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. Grenoble Alpes/CNRS, Grenoble (France)
  14. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
  15. Durham Univ., Durham (United Kingdom); Gemini Observatory, La Serena (Chile)
  16. Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)
  17. European Southern Observatory, Santiago (Chile)
  18. Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, Tucson, AZ (United States)
  19. Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)
  20. SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA (United States)
  21. NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), Moffett Field, CA (United States)
  22. The Univ. of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States)
  23. Univ. Grenoble Alpes/CNRS, Grenoble (France); Univ. of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)
  24. American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY (United States)
  25. Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)
  26. Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)
  27. Durham Univ., Durham (United Kingdom)
  28. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)
  29. California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)
  30. The Aerospace Corp., El Segundo, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1352119
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-717865
Journal ID: ISSN 1538-3881; TRN: US1700564
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Astronomical Journal (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Astronomical Journal (Online); Journal Volume: 153; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 1538-3881
Publisher:
IOP Publishing
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; planetary systems; stars: individual (HD 984)

Citation Formats

Johnson-Groh, Mara, Marois, Christian, De Rosa, Robert J., Nielsen, Eric L., Rameau, Julien, Blunt, Sarah, Vargas, Jeffrey, Ammons, S. Mark, Bailey, Vanessa P., Barman, Travis S., Bulger, Joanna, Chilcote, Jeffrey K., Cotten, Tara, Doyon, René, Duchêne, Gaspard, Fitzgerald, Michael P., Follette, Kate B., Goodsell, Stephen, Graham, James R., Greenbaum, Alexandra Z., Hibon, Pascale, Hung, Li -Wei, Ingraham, Patrick, Kalas, Paul, Konopacky, Quinn M., Larkin, James E., Macintosh, Bruce, Maire, Jérôme, Marchis, Franck, Marley, Mark S., Metchev, Stanimir, Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell A., Oppenheimer, Rebecca, Palmer, David W., Patience, Jenny, Perrin, Marshall, Poyneer, Lisa A., Pueyo, Laurent, Rajan, Abhijith, Rantakyrö, Fredrik T., Savransky, Dmitry, Schneider, Adam C., Sivaramakrishnan, Anand, Song, Inseok, Soummer, Remi, Thomas, Sandrine, Vega, David, Wallace, J. Kent, Wang, Jason J., Ward-Duong, Kimberly, Wiktorowicz, Sloane J., and Wolff, Schuyler G.. Integral field spectroscopy of the low-mass companion HD 984 B with the Gemini Planet Imager. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-3881/aa6480.
Johnson-Groh, Mara, Marois, Christian, De Rosa, Robert J., Nielsen, Eric L., Rameau, Julien, Blunt, Sarah, Vargas, Jeffrey, Ammons, S. Mark, Bailey, Vanessa P., Barman, Travis S., Bulger, Joanna, Chilcote, Jeffrey K., Cotten, Tara, Doyon, René, Duchêne, Gaspard, Fitzgerald, Michael P., Follette, Kate B., Goodsell, Stephen, Graham, James R., Greenbaum, Alexandra Z., Hibon, Pascale, Hung, Li -Wei, Ingraham, Patrick, Kalas, Paul, Konopacky, Quinn M., Larkin, James E., Macintosh, Bruce, Maire, Jérôme, Marchis, Franck, Marley, Mark S., Metchev, Stanimir, Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell A., Oppenheimer, Rebecca, Palmer, David W., Patience, Jenny, Perrin, Marshall, Poyneer, Lisa A., Pueyo, Laurent, Rajan, Abhijith, Rantakyrö, Fredrik T., Savransky, Dmitry, Schneider, Adam C., Sivaramakrishnan, Anand, Song, Inseok, Soummer, Remi, Thomas, Sandrine, Vega, David, Wallace, J. Kent, Wang, Jason J., Ward-Duong, Kimberly, Wiktorowicz, Sloane J., & Wolff, Schuyler G.. Integral field spectroscopy of the low-mass companion HD 984 B with the Gemini Planet Imager. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-3881/aa6480.
Johnson-Groh, Mara, Marois, Christian, De Rosa, Robert J., Nielsen, Eric L., Rameau, Julien, Blunt, Sarah, Vargas, Jeffrey, Ammons, S. Mark, Bailey, Vanessa P., Barman, Travis S., Bulger, Joanna, Chilcote, Jeffrey K., Cotten, Tara, Doyon, René, Duchêne, Gaspard, Fitzgerald, Michael P., Follette, Kate B., Goodsell, Stephen, Graham, James R., Greenbaum, Alexandra Z., Hibon, Pascale, Hung, Li -Wei, Ingraham, Patrick, Kalas, Paul, Konopacky, Quinn M., Larkin, James E., Macintosh, Bruce, Maire, Jérôme, Marchis, Franck, Marley, Mark S., Metchev, Stanimir, Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell A., Oppenheimer, Rebecca, Palmer, David W., Patience, Jenny, Perrin, Marshall, Poyneer, Lisa A., Pueyo, Laurent, Rajan, Abhijith, Rantakyrö, Fredrik T., Savransky, Dmitry, Schneider, Adam C., Sivaramakrishnan, Anand, Song, Inseok, Soummer, Remi, Thomas, Sandrine, Vega, David, Wallace, J. Kent, Wang, Jason J., Ward-Duong, Kimberly, Wiktorowicz, Sloane J., and Wolff, Schuyler G.. Fri . "Integral field spectroscopy of the low-mass companion HD 984 B with the Gemini Planet Imager". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-3881/aa6480. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1352119.
@article{osti_1352119,
title = {Integral field spectroscopy of the low-mass companion HD 984 B with the Gemini Planet Imager},
author = {Johnson-Groh, Mara and Marois, Christian and De Rosa, Robert J. and Nielsen, Eric L. and Rameau, Julien and Blunt, Sarah and Vargas, Jeffrey and Ammons, S. Mark and Bailey, Vanessa P. and Barman, Travis S. and Bulger, Joanna and Chilcote, Jeffrey K. and Cotten, Tara and Doyon, René and Duchêne, Gaspard and Fitzgerald, Michael P. and Follette, Kate B. and Goodsell, Stephen and Graham, James R. and Greenbaum, Alexandra Z. and Hibon, Pascale and Hung, Li -Wei and Ingraham, Patrick and Kalas, Paul and Konopacky, Quinn M. and Larkin, James E. and Macintosh, Bruce and Maire, Jérôme and Marchis, Franck and Marley, Mark S. and Metchev, Stanimir and Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell A. and Oppenheimer, Rebecca and Palmer, David W. and Patience, Jenny and Perrin, Marshall and Poyneer, Lisa A. and Pueyo, Laurent and Rajan, Abhijith and Rantakyrö, Fredrik T. and Savransky, Dmitry and Schneider, Adam C. and Sivaramakrishnan, Anand and Song, Inseok and Soummer, Remi and Thomas, Sandrine and Vega, David and Wallace, J. Kent and Wang, Jason J. and Ward-Duong, Kimberly and Wiktorowicz, Sloane J. and Wolff, Schuyler G.},
abstractNote = {We present new observations of the low-mass companion to HD 984 taken with the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) as a part of the GPI Exoplanet Survey campaign. Images of HD 984 B were obtained in the J (1.12–1.3 μm) and H (1.50–1.80 μm) bands. Combined with archival epochs from 2012 and 2014, we fit the first orbit to the companion to find an 18 au (70-year) orbit with a 68% confidence interval between 14 and 28 au, an eccentricity of 0.18 with a 68% confidence interval between 0.05 and 0.47, and an inclination of 119° with a 68% confidence interval between 114° and 125°. To address the considerable spectral covariance in both spectra, we present a method of splitting the spectra into low and high frequencies to analyze the spectral structure at different spatial frequencies with the proper spectral noise correlation. Using the split spectra, we compare them to known spectral types using field brown dwarf and low-mass star spectra and find a best-fit match of a field gravity M6.5 ± 1.5 spectral type with a corresponding temperature of ${2730}_{-180}^{+120}$ K. Photometry of the companion yields a luminosity of $\mathrm{log}({L}_{\mathrm{bol}}$/${L}_{\odot })=-2.88\pm 0.07$ dex with DUSTY models. Mass estimates, again from DUSTY models, find an age-dependent mass of 34 ± 1 to 95 ± 4 M Jup. Lastly, these results are consistent with previous measurements of the object.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-3881/aa6480},
journal = {Astronomical Journal (Online)},
number = 4,
volume = 153,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 31 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Mar 31 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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