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Title: A rare prenatal case with two de novo inversions and a translocation: 48, XX,t(9;12)(q32;p24.3), inv(11)(p15.1q25), inv(13)(q12.q22)

Abstract

Ultrasound examination of a para 1, gravida 2, 26 y.o. showed severe hydrocephalus and polyhydramnios. Amniocentesis was performed at 27 weeks. High resolution chromosome analysis revealed a karyotype with a 9;12 translocation, a pericentric inversion of chromosome 11, and a paracentric inversion of chromosome 13. Parental chromosome studies were normal. The mother was not on medication prior to her pregnancy and there was no known exposure to radiation. Delivery was at 34 weeks gestation. The phenotype consisted of micrognathia, low set ears, hypertelorism, and hydrodcephaly. Review of the literature revealed a single report with multiple de novo aberrations consisting of a 6;14 translocation and a deleted 7. This was diagnosed in the child of a woman with systemic lupus erythematous treated with azathioprine. These types of abnormalities have been known to be induced by chemical and radiation exposure. High resolution banding combined with molecular studies presently improve our ability to detect subtle structural aberrations.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Albany Medical College, Albany, NY (United States) [and others
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
134827
Report Number(s):
CONF-941009-
Journal ID: AJHGAG; ISSN 0002-9297; TRN: 95:005313-1566
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: American Journal of Human Genetics; Journal Volume: 55; Journal Issue: Suppl.3; Conference: 44. annual meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics, Montreal (Canada), 18-22 Oct 1994; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; HUMAN CHROMOSOME 9; CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS; DETECTION; FETUSES; CONGENITAL MALFORMATIONS; KARYOTYPE; HEREDITARY DISEASES; PHENOTYPE; HUMAN CHROMOSOME 12; HUMAN CHROMOSOMES; HUMAN CHROMOSOME 13; ULTRASONOGRAPHY; GENETICS

Citation Formats

Harrison, B., Balaban, L., and Eldred, C. A rare prenatal case with two de novo inversions and a translocation: 48, XX,t(9;12)(q32;p24.3), inv(11)(p15.1q25), inv(13)(q12.q22). United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Harrison, B., Balaban, L., & Eldred, C. A rare prenatal case with two de novo inversions and a translocation: 48, XX,t(9;12)(q32;p24.3), inv(11)(p15.1q25), inv(13)(q12.q22). United States.
Harrison, B., Balaban, L., and Eldred, C. 1994. "A rare prenatal case with two de novo inversions and a translocation: 48, XX,t(9;12)(q32;p24.3), inv(11)(p15.1q25), inv(13)(q12.q22)". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_134827,
title = {A rare prenatal case with two de novo inversions and a translocation: 48, XX,t(9;12)(q32;p24.3), inv(11)(p15.1q25), inv(13)(q12.q22)},
author = {Harrison, B. and Balaban, L. and Eldred, C.},
abstractNote = {Ultrasound examination of a para 1, gravida 2, 26 y.o. showed severe hydrocephalus and polyhydramnios. Amniocentesis was performed at 27 weeks. High resolution chromosome analysis revealed a karyotype with a 9;12 translocation, a pericentric inversion of chromosome 11, and a paracentric inversion of chromosome 13. Parental chromosome studies were normal. The mother was not on medication prior to her pregnancy and there was no known exposure to radiation. Delivery was at 34 weeks gestation. The phenotype consisted of micrognathia, low set ears, hypertelorism, and hydrodcephaly. Review of the literature revealed a single report with multiple de novo aberrations consisting of a 6;14 translocation and a deleted 7. This was diagnosed in the child of a woman with systemic lupus erythematous treated with azathioprine. These types of abnormalities have been known to be induced by chemical and radiation exposure. High resolution banding combined with molecular studies presently improve our ability to detect subtle structural aberrations.},
doi = {},
journal = {American Journal of Human Genetics},
number = Suppl.3,
volume = 55,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month = 9
}
  • This paper reports a further case of blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus inversus (BPES) syndrome associated with a reciprocal translocation [46,XY,t(3;7)(q23;32)], involving band 3q23. This case supports the assignment of a BPES gene(s) to the 3q23 region. 15 refs., 2 figs.
  • Rieger syndrome (MIM No{sup *}180500) is characterized by malformation of the anterior chamber of the eye, hypodontia, and the failure of the periumbilical skin to involute. Recently, consistent chromosomal abnormalities within 4q23{r_arrow}q27 have been reported with Rieger syndrome, and significant linkage of Rieger syndrome to 4q markers has been identified. Here we present a case of Rieger syndrome with de novo t(1;4)(q21,q25). The propositus was the first product of a 37-year-old mother and unrelated 42-year-old father. He was born at 41 weeks of gestation. Birth weight was 3,955 g length 50.0 cm, and OFC 37.0 cm. He had irregular shapedmore » pupils with a prominent Schwalbe`s line, umbilical hernia, bilateral vesico-ureteral regurgitation, gall stones, infantile spasms, and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum and agenesis of the anterior commissure. This and other previous reports suggest that the gene for Rieger syndrome maps to the 4q25{r_arrow}q26 segment. A cell line from our patient will contribute to isolating the gene for Rieger syndrome.« less
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