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Title: Characterizing the uptake, accumulation and toxicity of silver sulfide nanoparticles in plants

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ORCiD logo
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1347786
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Science: Nano; Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Wang, Peng, Lombi, Enzo, Sun, Shengkai, Scheckel, Kirk G., Malysheva, Anzhela, McKenna, Brigid A., Menzies, Neal W., Zhao, Fang-Jie, and Kopittke, Peter M.. Characterizing the uptake, accumulation and toxicity of silver sulfide nanoparticles in plants. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1039/C6EN00489J.
Wang, Peng, Lombi, Enzo, Sun, Shengkai, Scheckel, Kirk G., Malysheva, Anzhela, McKenna, Brigid A., Menzies, Neal W., Zhao, Fang-Jie, & Kopittke, Peter M.. Characterizing the uptake, accumulation and toxicity of silver sulfide nanoparticles in plants. United States. doi:10.1039/C6EN00489J.
Wang, Peng, Lombi, Enzo, Sun, Shengkai, Scheckel, Kirk G., Malysheva, Anzhela, McKenna, Brigid A., Menzies, Neal W., Zhao, Fang-Jie, and Kopittke, Peter M.. Sun . "Characterizing the uptake, accumulation and toxicity of silver sulfide nanoparticles in plants". United States. doi:10.1039/C6EN00489J.
@article{osti_1347786,
title = {Characterizing the uptake, accumulation and toxicity of silver sulfide nanoparticles in plants},
author = {Wang, Peng and Lombi, Enzo and Sun, Shengkai and Scheckel, Kirk G. and Malysheva, Anzhela and McKenna, Brigid A. and Menzies, Neal W. and Zhao, Fang-Jie and Kopittke, Peter M.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1039/C6EN00489J},
journal = {Environmental Science: Nano},
number = 2,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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