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Title: An Open Source Extensible Smart Energy Framework

Abstract

Aggregated distributed energy resources are the subject of much interest in the energy industry and are expected to play an important role in meeting our future energy needs by changing how we use, distribute and generate electricity. This energy future includes an increased amount of energy from renewable resources, load management techniques to improve resiliency and reliability, and distributed energy storage and generation capabilities that can be managed to meet the needs of the grid as well as individual customers. These energy assets are commonly referred to as Distributed Energy Resources (DER). DERs rely on a means to communicate information between an energy provider and multitudes of devices. Today DER control systems are typically vendor-specific, using custom hardware and software solutions. As a result, customers are locked into communication transport protocols, applications, tools, and data formats. Today’s systems are often difficult to extend to meet new application requirements, resulting in stranded assets when business requirements or energy management models evolve. By partnering with industry advisors and researchers, an implementation DER research platform was developed called the Smart Energy Framework (SEF). The hypothesis of this research was that an open source Internet of Things (IoT) framework could play a role inmore » creating a commodity-based eco-system for DER assets that would reduce costs and provide interoperable products. SEF is based on the AllJoynTM IoT open source framework. The demonstration system incorporated DER assets, specifically batteries and smart water heaters. To verify the behavior of the distributed system, models of water heaters and batteries were also developed. An IoT interface for communicating between the assets and a control server was defined. This interface supports a series of “events” and telemetry reporting, similar to those defined by current smart grid communication standards. The results of this effort demonstrated the feasibility and application potential of using IoT frameworks for the creation of commodity-based DER systems. All of the identified commodity-based system requirements were met by the AllJoyn framework. By having commodity solutions, small vendors can enter the market and the cost of implementation for all parties is reduced. Utilities and aggregators can choose from multiple interoperable products reducing the risk of stranded assets. Based on this research it is recommended that interfaces based on existing smart grid communication protocol standards be created for these emerging IoT frameworks. These interfaces should be standardized as part of the IoT framework allowing for interoperability testing and certification. Similarly, IoT frameworks are introducing application level security. This type of security is needed for protecting application and platforms and will be important moving forward. Recommendations are that along with DER-based data model interfaces, platform and application security requirements also be prescribed when IoT devices support DER applications.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. V-Squared, Portland, OR (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
V-Squared, Portland, OR (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
Contributing Org.:
Portland State University
OSTI Identifier:
1347747
Report Number(s):
V2001
DOE Contract Number:
SC0015791
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; 25 ENERGY STORAGE; distributed energy resources; software management systems

Citation Formats

Rankin, Linda. An Open Source Extensible Smart Energy Framework. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1347747.
Rankin, Linda. An Open Source Extensible Smart Energy Framework. United States. doi:10.2172/1347747.
Rankin, Linda. Thu . "An Open Source Extensible Smart Energy Framework". United States. doi:10.2172/1347747. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1347747.
@article{osti_1347747,
title = {An Open Source Extensible Smart Energy Framework},
author = {Rankin, Linda},
abstractNote = {Aggregated distributed energy resources are the subject of much interest in the energy industry and are expected to play an important role in meeting our future energy needs by changing how we use, distribute and generate electricity. This energy future includes an increased amount of energy from renewable resources, load management techniques to improve resiliency and reliability, and distributed energy storage and generation capabilities that can be managed to meet the needs of the grid as well as individual customers. These energy assets are commonly referred to as Distributed Energy Resources (DER). DERs rely on a means to communicate information between an energy provider and multitudes of devices. Today DER control systems are typically vendor-specific, using custom hardware and software solutions. As a result, customers are locked into communication transport protocols, applications, tools, and data formats. Today’s systems are often difficult to extend to meet new application requirements, resulting in stranded assets when business requirements or energy management models evolve. By partnering with industry advisors and researchers, an implementation DER research platform was developed called the Smart Energy Framework (SEF). The hypothesis of this research was that an open source Internet of Things (IoT) framework could play a role in creating a commodity-based eco-system for DER assets that would reduce costs and provide interoperable products. SEF is based on the AllJoynTM IoT open source framework. The demonstration system incorporated DER assets, specifically batteries and smart water heaters. To verify the behavior of the distributed system, models of water heaters and batteries were also developed. An IoT interface for communicating between the assets and a control server was defined. This interface supports a series of “events” and telemetry reporting, similar to those defined by current smart grid communication standards. The results of this effort demonstrated the feasibility and application potential of using IoT frameworks for the creation of commodity-based DER systems. All of the identified commodity-based system requirements were met by the AllJoyn framework. By having commodity solutions, small vendors can enter the market and the cost of implementation for all parties is reduced. Utilities and aggregators can choose from multiple interoperable products reducing the risk of stranded assets. Based on this research it is recommended that interfaces based on existing smart grid communication protocol standards be created for these emerging IoT frameworks. These interfaces should be standardized as part of the IoT framework allowing for interoperability testing and certification. Similarly, IoT frameworks are introducing application level security. This type of security is needed for protecting application and platforms and will be important moving forward. Recommendations are that along with DER-based data model interfaces, platform and application security requirements also be prescribed when IoT devices support DER applications.},
doi = {10.2172/1347747},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 23 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Mar 23 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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