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Title: An apparently de novo translocation in a neonate involving chromosomes 3 and 19 [t(3:19)(p21;q13.1)]

Abstract

A 7 1/2-week-old infant female was referred for cytogenetic evaluation after she developed a left inguinal hernia containing a gonadal mass. She had been born to a 25-year-old mother after approximately 31 weeks gestation. This was the couple`s first pregnancy. She was small for gestational age. Her weight was 835 g, length was 32 cm, head circumference was 26 cm at birth. She developed hypothyroidism requiring synthroid. There were no other obvious dysmorphisms. The cytogenetic findings with G-banding revealed an apparently-balanced translocation involving chromosomes 3 and 19. The patient`s karyotype revealed 46,XX,t(3;19)(q21;q13.1). Parental chromosomes were found to be normal. Because of the increased risk for developmental and other congenital problems in an individual with a {open_quotes}de novo translocation{close_quotes} (even when the rearrangement appears balanced), this infant is being followed regularly. Evaluation at 5 months of age revealed a small but thriving female infant who is alert and developmentally appropriate. She is still receiving synthroid. We are in the process of analyzing this case further using chromosome paint probes for chromosomes 3 and 19 to identify the break points more precisely. This would allow us to assess with greater accuracy if this is a {open_quotes}balanced{close_quotes} translocation.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Nassau County Medical Center, East Meadow, NY (United States) [and others
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
134611
Report Number(s):
CONF-941009-
Journal ID: AJHGAG; ISSN 0002-9297; TRN: 95:005313-1348
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: American Journal of Human Genetics; Journal Volume: 55; Journal Issue: Suppl.3; Conference: 44. annual meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics, Montreal (Canada), 18-22 Oct 1994; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; HUMAN CHROMOSOME 3; CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS; HUMAN CHROMOSOME 19; PATIENTS; KARYOTYPE; HYPOTHYROIDISM; PROBES; BANDING TECHNIQUES

Citation Formats

Shah, H.O., Buttice, L.S., and Chester, M. An apparently de novo translocation in a neonate involving chromosomes 3 and 19 [t(3:19)(p21;q13.1)]. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Shah, H.O., Buttice, L.S., & Chester, M. An apparently de novo translocation in a neonate involving chromosomes 3 and 19 [t(3:19)(p21;q13.1)]. United States.
Shah, H.O., Buttice, L.S., and Chester, M. 1994. "An apparently de novo translocation in a neonate involving chromosomes 3 and 19 [t(3:19)(p21;q13.1)]". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_134611,
title = {An apparently de novo translocation in a neonate involving chromosomes 3 and 19 [t(3:19)(p21;q13.1)]},
author = {Shah, H.O. and Buttice, L.S. and Chester, M.},
abstractNote = {A 7 1/2-week-old infant female was referred for cytogenetic evaluation after she developed a left inguinal hernia containing a gonadal mass. She had been born to a 25-year-old mother after approximately 31 weeks gestation. This was the couple`s first pregnancy. She was small for gestational age. Her weight was 835 g, length was 32 cm, head circumference was 26 cm at birth. She developed hypothyroidism requiring synthroid. There were no other obvious dysmorphisms. The cytogenetic findings with G-banding revealed an apparently-balanced translocation involving chromosomes 3 and 19. The patient`s karyotype revealed 46,XX,t(3;19)(q21;q13.1). Parental chromosomes were found to be normal. Because of the increased risk for developmental and other congenital problems in an individual with a {open_quotes}de novo translocation{close_quotes} (even when the rearrangement appears balanced), this infant is being followed regularly. Evaluation at 5 months of age revealed a small but thriving female infant who is alert and developmentally appropriate. She is still receiving synthroid. We are in the process of analyzing this case further using chromosome paint probes for chromosomes 3 and 19 to identify the break points more precisely. This would allow us to assess with greater accuracy if this is a {open_quotes}balanced{close_quotes} translocation.},
doi = {},
journal = {American Journal of Human Genetics},
number = Suppl.3,
volume = 55,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month = 9
}
  • We describe an infant boy with a unique de novo translocation involving chromosomes 1 and 4, resulting in dup(4q) and del(1p). His karyotype was 46,XY,-1,+der(1)t(1;4) (p36.2;q31.2). He had minor anomalies, congenital heart defect, respiratory distress, seizures, and central nervous system abnormalities. He died at age 11 weeks. The patient had manifestations of dup(4q) del(1p), and he was more seriously affected than patients having only one of these. No other patient with an identical chromosomal finding has been reported. 27 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.
  • Failure to establish the left-right embryonic axis results in abnormalities of laterality; situs solitus is replaced by situs inversus totalis or various degrees of heterotaxy involving the heart, great vessels, lungs, liver, spleen, and/or bowel. Laterality syndromes are likely to be genetically heterogeneous although specific human genes have not been identified. Families with dominant, recessive, and X-linked laterality syndromes have been reported as well as individuals with situs abnormalities and chromosome rearrangements. The latter offer the possibility of narrowing the gene search to specific chromosome regions. A recent report described an infant with polysplenia syndrome and a paracentric inversion ofmore » chromosome 11 [46,XX,inv(11)(q13q25)pat]. We report the second case of a child with laterality abnormalities and a chromosome rearrangement involving a similar breakpoint on chromosome 11. The proband is a 6 y/o female with mental retardation, dysmorphic features, pulmonic stenosis, asplenia, Hirschsprung disease, and a balanced, reciprocal translocation involving chromosomes 11 and 20 [46,XX,t(11;20)(q13,1;q13.13)pat]. Using DNA probes we have excluded uniparental disomy for chromosomes 11 and 20. If a gene for determination of laterality lies in the 11q13 region, the proband`s abnormalities could be the result of her receiving an allele disrupted by the paternal translocation as well as a mutant allele from her mother. To investigate this possibility, we are studying the segregation of maternal chromosome 11 markers in the proband and her balanced carrier and non-carrier siblings.« less
  • We present a 6-year-old girl with a balanced 11;20 translocation [46,XX,t(11;20)(q13.1;q13.13)pat], asplenia, pulmonic stenosis, Hirschsprung disease, minor anomalies, and mental retardation. This case represents the second report of an individual with situs abnormalities and a balanced chromosome rearrangement involving a breakpoint at 11q13. Segregation analysis of markers in the 11q13 region in the proposita and her phenotypically normal carrier sibs did not show a unique combination of maternal and paternal alleles in the patient. We discuss several possible explanations for the simultaneous occurrence of situs abnormalities and a balanced 11;20 translocation. These include (1) chance, (2) a further chromosome rearrangementmore » in the patient, (3) gene disruption and random situs determination, and (4) gene disruption plus transmission of a recessive or imprinted allele from the mother. 30 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.« less
  • Robertsonian translocations are usually ascertained through abnormal children, making proposed phenotypic effects of apparently balanced translocations difficult to study in an unbiased way. From molecular genetic studies, though, some apparently balanced rearrangments are now known to be associated with phenotypic abnormalities resulting from uniparental disomy. Molecular explanations for other cases in which abnormality is seen in a balanced translocation carrier are being sought. In the present paper, an infant is described who has retarded growth, developmental delay, gross muscular hypotonia, slender habitus, frontal bossing, micrognathia, hooked nose, abundant wispy hair, and blue sclerae. Cytogenetically, she appeared to be a carriermore » of a balanced, paternally derived 14;21 Robertsonian translocation. Analysis of DNA polymorphisms showed that she had no paternal allele at the D14S13 locus (14q32). Study of additional DNA markers within 14q32 revealed that her previously undescribed phenotype results from an interstitial microdeletion within 14q32. Fluorescent in situ hybridization was used to show that this microdeletion had occurred de novo on the Robertsonian translocation chromosome. These observations may reactivate old suspicions of a causal association between Robertsonian translocations and de novo rearrangements in offspring; a systematic search for similar subcytogentic rearrangements in other families, in which there are phenotypically abnormal children with apparently balanced translocations, may be fruitful. The clinical and molecular genetic data presented also define a new contiguous gene syndrome due to interstitial 14q32 deletion. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.« less
  • Craniosynostosis (CRS) is frequently seen in the del(7p) syndrome, and the gene for this cranial anomaly (CRS1) has been assigned to 7p21. The authors present a 3-year-old boy with CRS involving the sagittal and coronal sutures, who had a de novo and apparently balanced translocation, t(6;7)(q16.2;p15.3). Southern blot analysis of several loci on 7p14{yields}pter showed that the patient was heterozygous for HOX1I and IL6, possibly homozygous for D7S149, but hemizygous for D7S135 with a loss of the paternal allele. These findings suggest the localization of a candidate gene for CRS1 to be on 7p15.3 in the close proximity to themore » D7S135 locus. 19 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.« less