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Title: University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Anaerobic Dry Digestion Facility

Abstract

The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Anaerobic Dry Digestion Facility is a demonstration project that supported the first commercial-scale use in the United States of high solids, static pile technology for anaerobic digestion of organic waste to generate biogas for use in generating electricity and heat. The research adds to the understanding of startup, operation and supply chain issues for anaerobic digester technology. Issues and performance were documented for equipment installation and modifications, feedstock availability and quality, weekly loading and unloading of digestion chambers, chemical composition of biogas produced, and energy production. This facility also demonstrated an urban industrial ecology approach to siting such facilities near sewage treatment plants (to capture and use excess biogas generated by the plants) and organic yard waste collection sites (a source of feedstock).

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Wisconsin, Oshkosh, WI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Wisconsin, Oshkosh, WI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B)
Contributing Org.:
BioFerm Energy Systems, Madison, WI (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
1345064
Report Number(s):
DOE-UWO-EE0003135
DOE Contract Number:
EE0003135
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS

Citation Formats

Koker, John, and Lizotte, Michael. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Anaerobic Dry Digestion Facility. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1345064.
Koker, John, & Lizotte, Michael. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Anaerobic Dry Digestion Facility. United States. doi:10.2172/1345064.
Koker, John, and Lizotte, Michael. Wed . "University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Anaerobic Dry Digestion Facility". United States. doi:10.2172/1345064. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1345064.
@article{osti_1345064,
title = {University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Anaerobic Dry Digestion Facility},
author = {Koker, John and Lizotte, Michael},
abstractNote = {The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Anaerobic Dry Digestion Facility is a demonstration project that supported the first commercial-scale use in the United States of high solids, static pile technology for anaerobic digestion of organic waste to generate biogas for use in generating electricity and heat. The research adds to the understanding of startup, operation and supply chain issues for anaerobic digester technology. Issues and performance were documented for equipment installation and modifications, feedstock availability and quality, weekly loading and unloading of digestion chambers, chemical composition of biogas produced, and energy production. This facility also demonstrated an urban industrial ecology approach to siting such facilities near sewage treatment plants (to capture and use excess biogas generated by the plants) and organic yard waste collection sites (a source of feedstock).},
doi = {10.2172/1345064},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 08 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 08 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Municipal solid wastes contain numerous substances of potential environmental concern. While some understanding of the composition of raw municipal waste and its leachate products is available, no information regarding characteristics of solid, liquid and gaseous outputs from anaerobic digestion exists. If centralized anaerobic digestion plants are to be environmentally viable, the characteristics and environmental effects of effluents from these plants must be acceptable. The environmental concerns are particularly acute where ground water supplies are precariously low and the water table is high, South Florida is such a location. A characterization and environmental study was initiated by the Resource Recovery Groupmore » on August 1978. The specific objectives are: (1) systematic characterization of solid, liquid and gaseous inputs and outputs; (2) investigations of leaching characteristic of output solid and liquid effluents, and the transport of pollutants to and through ground water systems; and (3) analysis of environmental and process parameters to obtain causal relationships.« less
  • The findings of the characterization and environmental studies of an anaerobic digestion plant at Pompano Beach are presented. This 100 ton/day proof of concept plant which produces methane from municipal waste was built on an existing shredding and landfill site. The following aspects of the plant are covered: gas quality, airborne particulates, solid/liquid phases, microbiology, and leaching. (MHR)
  • Anaerobic digestion of municipal waste has been demonstrated to be feasible in bench scale experiments by Pfeffer (1974). Approximately, 50% reduction in mass and production of 6000 ft/sup 3/ of gas/ton have been estimated. The gas composition is estimated to be 50% methane and 50% carbon monoxide. The technical and economic feasibility of anaerobic digestion with an ultimate objective of commercialization are discussed. A plant has been built at Pompano Beach, Florida on an existing shredding and landfill operation site. The plant design capacity is 100 tons/day. Two digesters have been constructed to be used in parallel. The process consistsmore » of primary shredding, metal separation, secondary shredding, air classification and digestion of light fraction. Sewage sludge was used to seed the initial mixture in the digester. The output slurry is vacuum filtered and the filter cake disposed on an existing landfill. The filtrate is recycled. Excess filtrate is sprayed on the landfill. At present the output gas is being flared. A flow chart for the plant is presented. It is imperative that environmental investigations be conducted on new energy technology prior to commercialization. A project was initiated to characterize all input and output streams and to assess the potential for ground water contamination by landfill disposal of effluents. Detailed chemical, biological and physical characterization efforts supported by leaching and modelling studies are being conducted to achieve the stated objectives. Some mutagenic studies were also conducted. The environmental investigations were started in August 1978. Sengupta et al (1979a) reported the first year's efforts.« less
  • Beneficial and adverse environmental impacts associated with the proposed Anaerobic Digestion Facility located near the South Fork Chehalis River, in Boistfort Prairie, Lewis County, Washington, were evaluated. The proposed process would eliminate some animal waste pollution within the area, and also use methane created during the process to power an engine/generator. In addition, the process will permit dairy operators to recycle currently underutilized resources, namely fiber for bedding solids and nutrients for fertilizers. The impacts examined include air quality, water resources, soils, vegetation and wildfire, land use, noise, cultural resources, visual impacts, recreation, and wastes and polychlorinated biphenyls. (ACR)
  • This report summarizes the efforts during the period of February 1, 1981 to July 31, 1981. The plant functioned intermittently during February with complete stoppage from the end of March until the end of April. The feed rate has been below 4 tons/day. Apart from the regular investigations conducted, two new areas were initiated. Analysis of trace organics in the gas stream has started. Two samples collected in XAD traps were analyzed. Analyses for specific enteric and respiratory bacteria in plant air samples and other process streams have been initiated. Included are chapters on: gas quality; airborne particulates; bacteriology; leaching;more » and modeling.« less