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Title: i RadMat: A thermo-mechanical testing system for in situ high-energy X-ray characterization of radioactive specimens

Abstract

Here, we present an in situ Radiated Materials (iRadMat) experimental module designed to interface with a servo-hydraulic load frame for X-ray measurements at beamline 1-ID at the Advanced Photon Source. This new capability allows in situ studies of radioactive specimens subject to thermo-mechanical loading using a suite of high-energy X-ray scattering and imaging techniques. The iRadMat is a radiation-shielded vacuum heating system with the sample rotation-under-load capability. We describe the design features and performances of the iRadMat and present a dataset from a 300 °C uniaxial tensile test of a neutron-irradiated pure Fe specimen to demonstrate its capabilities.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Lemont, IL (United States)
  2. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Lemont, IL (United States); Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)
  3. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Lemont, IL (United States); Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., Shanghai (China)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE); Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET)
OSTI Identifier:
1344530
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1361743
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Review of Scientific Instruments
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 88; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Zhang, Xuan, Xu, Chi, Wang, Leyun, Chen, Yiren, Li, Meimei, Almer, Jonathan D., Benda, Erika, Kenesei, Peter, Mashayekhi, Ali, Park, Jun -Sang, and Westferro, Frank J. i RadMat: A thermo-mechanical testing system for in situ high-energy X-ray characterization of radioactive specimens. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4974246.
Zhang, Xuan, Xu, Chi, Wang, Leyun, Chen, Yiren, Li, Meimei, Almer, Jonathan D., Benda, Erika, Kenesei, Peter, Mashayekhi, Ali, Park, Jun -Sang, & Westferro, Frank J. i RadMat: A thermo-mechanical testing system for in situ high-energy X-ray characterization of radioactive specimens. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4974246.
Zhang, Xuan, Xu, Chi, Wang, Leyun, Chen, Yiren, Li, Meimei, Almer, Jonathan D., Benda, Erika, Kenesei, Peter, Mashayekhi, Ali, Park, Jun -Sang, and Westferro, Frank J. Fri . "i RadMat: A thermo-mechanical testing system for in situ high-energy X-ray characterization of radioactive specimens". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4974246. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1344530.
@article{osti_1344530,
title = {i RadMat: A thermo-mechanical testing system for in situ high-energy X-ray characterization of radioactive specimens},
author = {Zhang, Xuan and Xu, Chi and Wang, Leyun and Chen, Yiren and Li, Meimei and Almer, Jonathan D. and Benda, Erika and Kenesei, Peter and Mashayekhi, Ali and Park, Jun -Sang and Westferro, Frank J.},
abstractNote = {Here, we present an in situ Radiated Materials (iRadMat) experimental module designed to interface with a servo-hydraulic load frame for X-ray measurements at beamline 1-ID at the Advanced Photon Source. This new capability allows in situ studies of radioactive specimens subject to thermo-mechanical loading using a suite of high-energy X-ray scattering and imaging techniques. The iRadMat is a radiation-shielded vacuum heating system with the sample rotation-under-load capability. We describe the design features and performances of the iRadMat and present a dataset from a 300 °C uniaxial tensile test of a neutron-irradiated pure Fe specimen to demonstrate its capabilities.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4974246},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 1,
volume = 88,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 27 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Jan 27 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
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