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Title: Trade-offs between enzyme fitness and solubility illuminated by deep mutational scanning

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1343782
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 114; Journal Issue: 9; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-06-25 06:33:05; Journal ID: ISSN 0027-8424
Publisher:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Klesmith, Justin R., Bacik, John-Paul, Wrenbeck, Emily E., Michalczyk, Ryszard, and Whitehead, Timothy A.. Trade-offs between enzyme fitness and solubility illuminated by deep mutational scanning. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.1614437114.
Klesmith, Justin R., Bacik, John-Paul, Wrenbeck, Emily E., Michalczyk, Ryszard, & Whitehead, Timothy A.. Trade-offs between enzyme fitness and solubility illuminated by deep mutational scanning. United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1614437114.
Klesmith, Justin R., Bacik, John-Paul, Wrenbeck, Emily E., Michalczyk, Ryszard, and Whitehead, Timothy A.. Tue . "Trade-offs between enzyme fitness and solubility illuminated by deep mutational scanning". United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1614437114.
@article{osti_1343782,
title = {Trade-offs between enzyme fitness and solubility illuminated by deep mutational scanning},
author = {Klesmith, Justin R. and Bacik, John-Paul and Wrenbeck, Emily E. and Michalczyk, Ryszard and Whitehead, Timothy A.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.1614437114},
journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
number = 9,
volume = 114,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 14 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Feb 14 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1073/pnas.1614437114

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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