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Title: Low friction wear resistant graphene films

Abstract

A low friction wear surface with a coefficient of friction in the superlubric regime including graphene and nanoparticles on the wear surface is provided, and methods of producing the low friction wear surface are also provided. A long lifetime wear resistant surface including graphene exposed to hydrogen is provided, including methods of increasing the lifetime of graphene containing wear surfaces by providing hydrogen to the wear surface.

Inventors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1342742
Patent Number(s):
9,561,526
Application Number:
14/309,366
Assignee:
UChicago Argonne, LLC (Chicago, IL) ANL
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Patent
Resource Relation:
Patent File Date: 2014 Jun 19
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING

Citation Formats

Sumant, Anirudha V., Berman, Diana, and Erdemir, Ali. Low friction wear resistant graphene films. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Sumant, Anirudha V., Berman, Diana, & Erdemir, Ali. Low friction wear resistant graphene films. United States.
Sumant, Anirudha V., Berman, Diana, and Erdemir, Ali. Tue . "Low friction wear resistant graphene films". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1342742.
@article{osti_1342742,
title = {Low friction wear resistant graphene films},
author = {Sumant, Anirudha V. and Berman, Diana and Erdemir, Ali},
abstractNote = {A low friction wear surface with a coefficient of friction in the superlubric regime including graphene and nanoparticles on the wear surface is provided, and methods of producing the low friction wear surface are also provided. A long lifetime wear resistant surface including graphene exposed to hydrogen is provided, including methods of increasing the lifetime of graphene containing wear surfaces by providing hydrogen to the wear surface.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 07 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Feb 07 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Patent:

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  • An article and method of manufacture of a nanocrystalline diamond film are disclosed. The nanocrystalline film is prepared by forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing an inert gas containing gas stream and combining the gas stream with the carbonaceous containing vapor. A plasma of the combined vapor and gas stream is formed in a chamber and fragmented carbon species are deposited onto a substrate to form the nanocrystalline diamond film having a root mean square flatness of about 50 nm deviation from flatness in the as deposited state.
  • An article and method of manufacture of a nanocrystalline diamond film. The nanocrystalline film is prepared by forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing an inert gas containing gas stream and combining the gas stream with the carbonaceous containing vapor. A plasma of the combined vapor and gas stream is formed in a chamber and fragmented carbon species are deposited onto a substrate to form the nanocrystalline diamond film having a root mean square flatness of about 50 nm deviation from flatness in the as deposited state.
  • The potential of different magnetron sputtering techniques for the synthesis of low friction and wear resistant amorphous carbon nitride (a-CN{sub x}) thin films onto temperature-sensitive AISI52100 bearing steel, but also Si(001) substrates was studied. Hence, a substrate temperature of 150 °C was chosen for the film synthesis. The a-CN{sub x} films were deposited using mid-frequency magnetron sputtering (MFMS) with an MF bias voltage, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) with a synchronized HiPIMS bias voltage, and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) with a DC bias voltage. The films were deposited using a N{sub 2}/Ar flow ratio of 0.16 at the totalmore » pressure of 400 mPa. The negative bias voltage, V{sub s}, was varied from 20 to 120 V in each of the three deposition modes. The microstructure of the films was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction, while the film morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. All films possessed an amorphous microstructure, while the film morphology changed with the bias voltage. Layers grown applying the lowest substrate bias of 20 V exhibited pronounced intercolumnar porosity, independent of the sputter technique. Voids closed and dense films are formed at V{sub s} ≥ 60 V, V{sub s} ≥ 100 V, and V{sub s} = 120 V for MFMS, DCMS, and HiPIMS, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the nitrogen-to-carbon ratio, N/C, of the films ranged between 0.2 and 0.24. Elastic recoil detection analysis showed that Ar content varied between 0 and 0.8 at. % and increased as a function of V{sub s} for all deposition techniques. All films exhibited compressive residual stress, σ, which depends on the growth method; HiPIMS produces the least stressed films with values ranging between −0.4 and −1.2 GPa for all V{sub s}, while CN{sub x} films deposited by MFMS showed residual stresses up to −4.2 GPa. Nanoindentation showed a significant increase in film hardness and reduced elastic modulus with increasing V{sub s} for all techniques. The harder films were produced by MFMS with hardness as high as 25 GPa. Low friction coefficients, between 0.05 and 0.06, were recorded for all films. Furthermore, CN{sub x} films produced by MFMS and DCMS at V{sub s} = 100 and 120 V presented a high wear resistance with wear coefficients of k ≤ 2.3 × 10{sup −5} mm{sup 3}/Nm. While all CN{sub x} films exhibit low friction, wear depends strongly on the structural and mechanical characteristics of the films. The MFMS mode is best suited for the production of hard CN{sub x} films, although high compressive stresses challenge the application on steel substrates. Films grown in HiPIMS mode provide adequate adhesion due to low residual stress values, at the expense of lower film hardness. Thus, a relatively wide mechanical property envelope is presented for CN{sub x} films, which is relevant for the optimization of CN{sub x} film properties intended to be applied as low friction and wear resistant coatings.« less
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  • An article having a multiphase composite lubricant coating of a hard refractory matrix phase of titanium nitride dispersed with particles of a solid lubricating phase of molybdenum disulfide is prepared by heating the article to temperatures between 350.degree. and 850.degree. C. in a reaction vessel at a reduced pressure and passing a gaseous mixture of Ti((CH.sub.3).sub.2 N).sub.4, MoF.sub.6, H.sub.2 S and NH.sub.3 over the heated article forming a multiphase composite lubricant coating on the article.