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Title: Utilization of selected biorenewable resources: solubilization of lignocellulosics and conjugation of soybean oil

Abstract

In recent years, concern has risen over the use of fossil fuels due to their contribution to global warming, and to our dependence on imports of petroleum from nations that could pose a threat to national security. As a result, it has become increasingly important to develop technologies to replace fossil fuel based products with biorenewable alternatives. In this thesis nearly quantitative solubilization of lignocellulosic materials using phosphite esters has been realized, and is presented as a potential pretreatment for production of fermentable sugars for use in manufacturing commodity chemicals, specifically ethanol. Water solubilization of lignocellulosics using phosphite esters will enhance digestibility by disrupting the lignocellulose structure, changing cellulose morphology, and cleaving some glycosidic bonds. In a second project, soybean oil, which contains un-conjugated polyunsaturated fatty acid esters, is isomerized into oil containing conjugated polyunsaturates. The process is carried out under photochemical conditions using iodine as a catalyst in a hexanes solution to achieve 99% conjugation. The resulting conjugated soybean oil is demonstrated to have enhanced drying properties for use in alkyd resins.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1342576
Report Number(s):
IS-T-3180
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11358
Resource Type:
Thesis/Dissertation
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS

Citation Formats

Oshel, Reed E. Utilization of selected biorenewable resources: solubilization of lignocellulosics and conjugation of soybean oil. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/1342576.
Oshel, Reed E. Utilization of selected biorenewable resources: solubilization of lignocellulosics and conjugation of soybean oil. United States. doi:10.2172/1342576.
Oshel, Reed E. Mon . "Utilization of selected biorenewable resources: solubilization of lignocellulosics and conjugation of soybean oil". United States. doi:10.2172/1342576. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1342576.
@article{osti_1342576,
title = {Utilization of selected biorenewable resources: solubilization of lignocellulosics and conjugation of soybean oil},
author = {Oshel, Reed E.},
abstractNote = {In recent years, concern has risen over the use of fossil fuels due to their contribution to global warming, and to our dependence on imports of petroleum from nations that could pose a threat to national security. As a result, it has become increasingly important to develop technologies to replace fossil fuel based products with biorenewable alternatives. In this thesis nearly quantitative solubilization of lignocellulosic materials using phosphite esters has been realized, and is presented as a potential pretreatment for production of fermentable sugars for use in manufacturing commodity chemicals, specifically ethanol. Water solubilization of lignocellulosics using phosphite esters will enhance digestibility by disrupting the lignocellulose structure, changing cellulose morphology, and cleaving some glycosidic bonds. In a second project, soybean oil, which contains un-conjugated polyunsaturated fatty acid esters, is isomerized into oil containing conjugated polyunsaturates. The process is carried out under photochemical conditions using iodine as a catalyst in a hexanes solution to achieve 99% conjugation. The resulting conjugated soybean oil is demonstrated to have enhanced drying properties for use in alkyd resins.},
doi = {10.2172/1342576},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Thesis/Dissertation:
Other availability
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