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Title: Emissivity Measurements of Additively Manufactured Materials

Abstract

The emissivity of common 3D printing materials such as ABS and PLA were measured using a reflectivity meter and have the measured value of approximately 0.92. Adding a conductive material to the filament appears to cause a decrease in the emissivity of the surface. The angular dependence of the emissivity and the apparent temperature was measured using a FLIR infrared camera showing that the emissivity does not change much for shallow angles less than 40 angular degrees, and drops off dramatically after 70 angular degrees.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1341825
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-7-20513
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Morgan, Robert Vaughn, Reid, Robert Stowers, Baker, Andrew M., Lucero, Briana, and Bernardin, John David. Emissivity Measurements of Additively Manufactured Materials. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1341825.
Morgan, Robert Vaughn, Reid, Robert Stowers, Baker, Andrew M., Lucero, Briana, & Bernardin, John David. Emissivity Measurements of Additively Manufactured Materials. United States. doi:10.2172/1341825.
Morgan, Robert Vaughn, Reid, Robert Stowers, Baker, Andrew M., Lucero, Briana, and Bernardin, John David. Wed . "Emissivity Measurements of Additively Manufactured Materials". United States. doi:10.2172/1341825. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1341825.
@article{osti_1341825,
title = {Emissivity Measurements of Additively Manufactured Materials},
author = {Morgan, Robert Vaughn and Reid, Robert Stowers and Baker, Andrew M. and Lucero, Briana and Bernardin, John David},
abstractNote = {The emissivity of common 3D printing materials such as ABS and PLA were measured using a reflectivity meter and have the measured value of approximately 0.92. Adding a conductive material to the filament appears to cause a decrease in the emissivity of the surface. The angular dependence of the emissivity and the apparent temperature was measured using a FLIR infrared camera showing that the emissivity does not change much for shallow angles less than 40 angular degrees, and drops off dramatically after 70 angular degrees.},
doi = {10.2172/1341825},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 25 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Jan 25 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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