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Title: Overcoming the Fundamental Bottlenecks to a new world-record silicon solar cell. Final Technical Report

Abstract

The objective of the work performed within this contract is to reveal the materials and device physics that currently limit the experimental world record efficiency to 25% for single junction Si (2013), and to demonstrate 26.5% efficiency. The starting efficiency for this project was 23.9% in 2013. Four strategies are being combined throughout the project to achieve 26.5% cell efficiency: (1) passivated contacts via tunnel dielectrics, (2) emitter optimization and passivation through dopant profile engineering, (3) enhanced light trapping through development of photonic crystals and (4) base optimization.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)
  2. Fraunhofer Inst. for Solar Energy Systems, Freiburg (Germany)
  3. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
Contributing Org.:
NREL, Fraunhofer ISE
OSTI Identifier:
1341792
Report Number(s):
DOE-GT-6336
DOE Contract Number:
EE0006336
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY

Citation Formats

Rohatgi, Ajeet, Zimbardi, Francesco, Rounsaville, Brian, Benick, Jan, Stradins, Pauls, Norman, Andrew, Lee, Benjamin, Upadhyaya, Ajay, Ok, Young-Woo, Tao, Yuguo, and Tam, Andrew. Overcoming the Fundamental Bottlenecks to a new world-record silicon solar cell. Final Technical Report. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Rohatgi, Ajeet, Zimbardi, Francesco, Rounsaville, Brian, Benick, Jan, Stradins, Pauls, Norman, Andrew, Lee, Benjamin, Upadhyaya, Ajay, Ok, Young-Woo, Tao, Yuguo, & Tam, Andrew. Overcoming the Fundamental Bottlenecks to a new world-record silicon solar cell. Final Technical Report. United States.
Rohatgi, Ajeet, Zimbardi, Francesco, Rounsaville, Brian, Benick, Jan, Stradins, Pauls, Norman, Andrew, Lee, Benjamin, Upadhyaya, Ajay, Ok, Young-Woo, Tao, Yuguo, and Tam, Andrew. Tue . "Overcoming the Fundamental Bottlenecks to a new world-record silicon solar cell. Final Technical Report". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1341792,
title = {Overcoming the Fundamental Bottlenecks to a new world-record silicon solar cell. Final Technical Report},
author = {Rohatgi, Ajeet and Zimbardi, Francesco and Rounsaville, Brian and Benick, Jan and Stradins, Pauls and Norman, Andrew and Lee, Benjamin and Upadhyaya, Ajay and Ok, Young-Woo and Tao, Yuguo and Tam, Andrew},
abstractNote = {The objective of the work performed within this contract is to reveal the materials and device physics that currently limit the experimental world record efficiency to 25% for single junction Si (2013), and to demonstrate 26.5% efficiency. The starting efficiency for this project was 23.9% in 2013. Four strategies are being combined throughout the project to achieve 26.5% cell efficiency: (1) passivated contacts via tunnel dielectrics, (2) emitter optimization and passivation through dopant profile engineering, (3) enhanced light trapping through development of photonic crystals and (4) base optimization.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 31 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Jan 31 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:
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