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Title: Interplay between Magnetism, Superconductivity, and Orbital Order in 5-Pocket Model for Iron-Based Superconductors: Parquet Renormalization Group Study

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1341319
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0014402
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physical Review Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 118; Journal Issue: 3; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-01-24 16:43:29; Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9007
Publisher:
American Physical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Classen, Laura, Xing, Rui-Qi, Khodas, Maxim, and Chubukov, Andrey V. Interplay between Magnetism, Superconductivity, and Orbital Order in 5-Pocket Model for Iron-Based Superconductors: Parquet Renormalization Group Study. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.037001.
Classen, Laura, Xing, Rui-Qi, Khodas, Maxim, & Chubukov, Andrey V. Interplay between Magnetism, Superconductivity, and Orbital Order in 5-Pocket Model for Iron-Based Superconductors: Parquet Renormalization Group Study. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.037001.
Classen, Laura, Xing, Rui-Qi, Khodas, Maxim, and Chubukov, Andrey V. Fri . "Interplay between Magnetism, Superconductivity, and Orbital Order in 5-Pocket Model for Iron-Based Superconductors: Parquet Renormalization Group Study". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.037001.
@article{osti_1341319,
title = {Interplay between Magnetism, Superconductivity, and Orbital Order in 5-Pocket Model for Iron-Based Superconductors: Parquet Renormalization Group Study},
author = {Classen, Laura and Xing, Rui-Qi and Khodas, Maxim and Chubukov, Andrey V.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.037001},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
number = 3,
volume = 118,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 20 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Jan 20 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.037001

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 3works
Citation information provided by
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  • Cited by 24
  • Magnetism and nematic order are the two nonsuperconducting orders observed in iron-based superconductors. To elucidate the interplay between them and ultimately unveil the pairing mechanism, several models have been investigated. In models with quenched orbital degrees of freedom, magnetic fluctuations promote stripe magnetism, which induces orbital order. In models with quenched spin degrees of freedom, charge fluctuations promote spontaneous orbital order, which induces stripe magnetism. Here, we develop an unbiased approach, in which we treat magnetic and orbital fluctuations on equal footing. Key to our approach is the inclusion of the orbital character of the low-energy electronic states into renormalizationmore » group (RG) analysis. We analyze the RG flow of the couplings and argue that the same magnetic fluctuations, which are known to promote s ± superconductivity, also promote an attraction in the orbital channel, even if the bare orbital interaction is repulsive. We next analyze the RG flow of the susceptibilities and show that, if all Fermi pockets are small, the system first develops a spontaneous orbital order, then s ± superconductivity, and magnetic order does not develop down to T=0. We argue that this scenario applies to FeSe. In systems with larger pockets, such as BaFe 2As 2 and LaFeAsO, we find that the leading instability is either towards a spin-density wave or superconductivity. We argue that in this situation nematic order is caused by composite spin fluctuations and is vestigial to stripe magnetism. Finally, our results provide a unifying description of different iron-based materials.« less
    Cited by 19
  • Magnetism and nematic order are the two nonsuperconducting orders observed in iron-based superconductors. To elucidate the interplay between them and ultimately unveil the pairing mechanism, several models have been investigated. In models with quenched orbital degrees of freedom, magnetic fluctuations promote stripe magnetism, which induces orbital order. In models with quenched spin degrees of freedom, charge fluctuations promote spontaneous orbital order, which induces stripe magnetism. Here, we develop an unbiased approach, in which we treat magnetic and orbital fluctuations on equal footing. Key to our approach is the inclusion of the orbital character of the low-energy electronic states into renormalizationmore » group (RG) analysis. We analyze the RG flow of the couplings and argue that the same magnetic fluctuations, which are known to promote s ± superconductivity, also promote an attraction in the orbital channel, even if the bare orbital interaction is repulsive. We next analyze the RG flow of the susceptibilities and show that, if all Fermi pockets are small, the system first develops a spontaneous orbital order, then s ± superconductivity, and magnetic order does not develop down to T=0. We argue that this scenario applies to FeSe. In systems with larger pockets, such as BaFe 2As 2 and LaFeAsO, we find that the leading instability is either towards a spin-density wave or superconductivity. We argue that in this situation nematic order is caused by composite spin fluctuations and is vestigial to stripe magnetism. Finally, our results provide a unifying description of different iron-based materials.« less
  • This proposal is for theoretical work on strongly correlated electron systems, which are at the center of experimental and theoretical activities in condensed-matter physics. The interest to this field is driven fascinating variety of observed effects, universality of underlying theoretical ideas, and practical applications. I propose to do research on Iron-based superconductors (FeSCs), which currently attract high attention in the physics community. My goal is to understand superconductivity and magnetism in these materials at various dopings, the interplay between the two, and the physics in the phase in which magnetism and superconductivity co-exist. A related goal is to understand themore » origin of the observed pseudogap-like behavior in the normal state. My research explores the idea that superconductivity is of electronic origin and is caused by the exchange of spin-fluctuations, enhanced due to close proximity to antiferromagnetism. The multi-orbital/multi-band nature of FeSCs opens routes for qualitatively new superconducting states, particularly the ones which break time-reversal symmetry. By all accounts, the coupling in pnictdes is below the threshold for Mott physics and I intend to analyze these systems within the itinerant approach. My plan is to do research in two stages. I first plan to address several problems within weak-coupling approach. Among them: (i) what sets stripe magnetic order at small doping, (ii) is there a preemptive instability into a spin-nematic state, and how stripe order affects fermions; (iii) is there a co-existence between magnetism and superconductivity and what are the system properties in the co-existence state; (iv) how superconductivity emerges despite strong Coulomb repulsion and can the gap be s-wave but with nodes along electron FSs, (v) are there complex superconducting states, like s+id, which break time reversal symmetry. My second goal is to go beyond weak coupling and derive spin-mediated, dynamic interaction between fermions, understand what sets the upper scale for attractive interaction, compute T_c, and then obtain and solve matrix non-linear gap equation for spin-mediated pairing and study various feedbacks from the pairing on fermions on ARPES spectra, optical and thermal conductivity, and other observables, The problems I have chosen are quite generic, and the understanding of magnetically-mediated superconductivity in the strong-coupling regime will not only advance the theory of superconductivity in FeSCs, but will contribute to a generic understanding of the pairing of fermions near quantum-critical points -- the problems ranging from s-wave pairing by soft optical phonons to to color superconductivity of quarks mediated by a gluon exchange.« less