skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Gonadal dysgenesis, Turner syndrome with 46,XX,del(18p)3

Abstract

The authors report a case of a female infant with gonadal dysgenesis, clinical features of Turner syndrome and a de novo del(18p). The factors controlling gonadal dysgenesis and Turner syndrome are unknown to date. The genes involved could be located not only on X chromosome but also on autosomes. The present case suggests that one of these genes is situated on the short arm of chromosome 18. We conclude that patients with del(18p) syndrome should be evaluated for gonadal dysgenesis.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Hopital Saint Vincent de Paul, Paris (France)
  2. CNRS, Villejif (France) [and others
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
133765
Report Number(s):
CONF-941009-
Journal ID: AJHGAG; ISSN 0002-9297; TRN: 95:005313-0497
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: American Journal of Human Genetics; Journal Volume: 55; Journal Issue: Suppl.3; Conference: 44. annual meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics, Montreal (Canada), 18-22 Oct 1994; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; HUMAN CHROMOSOMES; CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS; GENETIC MAPPING; HUMAN X CHROMOSOME; PATIENTS; CONGENITAL MALFORMATIONS; UROGENITAL SYSTEM DISEASES; GENES; GONADS

Citation Formats

Telvi, L., Ion, R., and Bernheim, A. Gonadal dysgenesis, Turner syndrome with 46,XX,del(18p)3. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Telvi, L., Ion, R., & Bernheim, A. Gonadal dysgenesis, Turner syndrome with 46,XX,del(18p)3. United States.
Telvi, L., Ion, R., and Bernheim, A. 1994. "Gonadal dysgenesis, Turner syndrome with 46,XX,del(18p)3". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_133765,
title = {Gonadal dysgenesis, Turner syndrome with 46,XX,del(18p)3},
author = {Telvi, L. and Ion, R. and Bernheim, A.},
abstractNote = {The authors report a case of a female infant with gonadal dysgenesis, clinical features of Turner syndrome and a de novo del(18p). The factors controlling gonadal dysgenesis and Turner syndrome are unknown to date. The genes involved could be located not only on X chromosome but also on autosomes. The present case suggests that one of these genes is situated on the short arm of chromosome 18. We conclude that patients with del(18p) syndrome should be evaluated for gonadal dysgenesis.},
doi = {},
journal = {American Journal of Human Genetics},
number = Suppl.3,
volume = 55,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month = 9
}
  • A 14 8/12-year-old white female patient was evaluated for short stature and amenorrhea. The past and family history were unremarkable. The physical examination revealed a short girl (131.4 cm; height age: 9) with a weight of 39.5kg (weight age: 11-6/12). The blood pressure was in the normal range in all four extremities and the peripheral pulses were positive. She had stigmata of Turner`s syndrome including short neck and slight webbing, cubitus valgus, and shield chest. There was no heart murmur. The only pubertal sign was pubic hair of Tanner stage II. The chromosome study showed a mosaic pattern. A totalmore » of 67 cultured lymphocytes from peripheral blood were analyzed which revealed 13 cells with 45,XO; 14 with 46,XY,r(Y); 39 with 46,XY. The patient had a normal vagina and hypoplastic uterus by sonogram. The diagnosis of mixed gonadal dysgenesis was confirmed by exploratory laparotomy and bilateral gonadectomy. The histologic examination of the gonads showed a testicle on the left and a streak ovary on right. The karyotype of the testicular tissue revealed 45,XO in 32 out of 40 and 46,XY in the remaining 8 cells. Pre-operative hormonal evaluation showed elevated gonadotropin levels of FSH 73.5 and LH 12.5 mIU/ml, low estradiol level of 5 pg/ml, normal testosterone level of 18 and DHEA-S of 181 mcg/dl, and normal thyroid function test with T4 of 6 mcg/dl and TSH of 4.2 mIU/ml. Her bone age was 12 years. The patient was also found to have subnormal growth hormone (GH) secretion by overnight GH study (1.55 ng/ml), clonidine stimulation test (7.3ng/ml), and insulin stimulation test (9.2 ng/ml). She responded well to human synthetic GH treatment with a growth velocity of 11.5 cm in two years. Replacement of sex hormones will be initiated after the completion of growth.« less
  • We report on a girl with syndromal gonadal dysgenesis and a de novo del (18p). Genetic factors controlling gonadal development are located not only on the X chromosome, but also on autosomes. The present case suggests that one of these genes is situated on 18p. We conclude that patients with del (18p) syndrome should be evaluated for gonadal dysgenesis. 16 refs., 3 figs.
  • The Y chromosome gene SRY (sex-determining region, Y gene) has been equated with the mammalian testis-determining factor. The SRY gene of five subjects with 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis (46,XY karyotype, completely female external genitalia, normal Muellerian ducts, and streak gonads) was evaluated for possible mutations in the coding region by using both single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assay and DNA sequencing. Mutations were identified in three subjects, of which two gave altered SSCP patterns. Two of them were point mutations causing amino acid substitutions, and the third was a single-base deletion causing a frameshift. All three mutations caused alterations in themore » putative DNA-binding region of the SRY protein. Genomic DNA was obtained from the fathers of two of the three mutant patients: one mutation was demonstrated to be de novo, and the other was inherited. The presence of SRY mutations in three of five patients suggest that the frequency of SRY mutations in XY females is higher than current estimates. 25 refs., 2 figs.« less
  • In a nationwide population-based study of women born between 1950 and 1976, 75 patients with XX gonadal dysgenesis (XXGD) were identified in Finland. Patients were ascertained through hospital records and the registers of chromosome laboratories. In one family 4 daughters were affected; in six families 2 daughters were affected; and 57 cases were isolated. In one additional family the two affected females were in successive generations. Population records were utilized to trace ancestors of patients back to the beginning of the 19th century, in most cases. Consanguinity was detected in 8 (12%) of 66 families. When females only are considered,more » the segregation analyses yield a proportion of .23 affected. The relatively large number of affected individuals identified (incidence 1 in 8,300 live-born girls) implies a high gene frequency in the Finnish population. The geographic distribution was highly uneven, with most families originating in the sparsely populated north-central part of Finland. These findings support the existence of an autosomal recessive (XXGD) gene (locus designation [open quotes]ODG1[close quotes]) that is highly enriched in Finland. The multiplex families already identified will make it possible to map the ODG1 gene by a random search for linkage by using polymorphic markers. Linkage-disequilibrium analysis in the sporadic patients will then be used to test for genetic homogeneity versus heterogeneity. 27 refs., 3 figs.« less
  • The authors report on a group of 9 subjects who had a 46,XY karyotype, ambiguous genitalia, abnormalities of sexual duct formation, and lack of gonadal tissue on one or both sides. This is sometimes referred to as {open_quotes}embryonic testicular regression.{close_quotes} Previous investigators have suggested that this condition results from loss of testes at a critical stage in development. The authors examined the possibility that embryonic testicular regression is part of the clinical spectrum of 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis. Four subjects totally lacked gonadal tissue, three of them having ambiguous genitalia, and one a micropenis. The development of incongruous sexual ducts (presencemore » of Muellerian ducts in the subject with micropenis, and absence of Muellerian and Wolffian ducts in two subjects with ambiguous genitalia) suggests that the embryonic gonads were intrinsically functionally abnormal before their disappearance. Five subjects had unilateral gonadal tissue, ambiguous genitalia, and a mix of Wolffian and Muellerian structures. The development of incongruous sexual ducts in 3 of them, the presence of ambiguous external genitalia in 5, and the presence of abnormal gonadal histology in 2 patients all indicate an underlying abnormality of gonadal differentiation in these subjects. The occurrence of testicular regression in several subjects in the family of one patient suggests a genetic basis for the condition. The presence of multiple congenital anomalies in other subjects in the study suggests either a mutation in a single gene that functions in several developmental pathways, or a defect of multiple genes that might be the result of a chromosome deletion. The sex-determining region Y (SRY) gene was sequenced in five subjects and was normal in all of them, suggesting that the underlying genetic abnormality in these subjects is located in one of several genes that function subsequent to SRY in the early stages of testis differentiation. 37 refs., 2 tabs.« less