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Title: ESTIMATING VELOCITY AND ATTENUATION CHANGES DUE TO CO2 SATURATION USING THE ACTIVE DOUBLET METHOD: A SYNTHETIC STUDY

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1337075
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-07-3033
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 6TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON CARBON CAPTURE & SEQUESTRATION ; 200705 ; PITTSBURGH
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

ZHOU, RONGMAO, HUANG, LIANJIE, ROBERTS, PETER M., and RUTLEDGE, JAMES T. ESTIMATING VELOCITY AND ATTENUATION CHANGES DUE TO CO2 SATURATION USING THE ACTIVE DOUBLET METHOD: A SYNTHETIC STUDY. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
ZHOU, RONGMAO, HUANG, LIANJIE, ROBERTS, PETER M., & RUTLEDGE, JAMES T. ESTIMATING VELOCITY AND ATTENUATION CHANGES DUE TO CO2 SATURATION USING THE ACTIVE DOUBLET METHOD: A SYNTHETIC STUDY. United States.
ZHOU, RONGMAO, HUANG, LIANJIE, ROBERTS, PETER M., and RUTLEDGE, JAMES T. Fri . "ESTIMATING VELOCITY AND ATTENUATION CHANGES DUE TO CO2 SATURATION USING THE ACTIVE DOUBLET METHOD: A SYNTHETIC STUDY". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1337075.
@article{osti_1337075,
title = {ESTIMATING VELOCITY AND ATTENUATION CHANGES DUE TO CO2 SATURATION USING THE ACTIVE DOUBLET METHOD: A SYNTHETIC STUDY},
author = {ZHOU, RONGMAO and HUANG, LIANJIE and ROBERTS, PETER M. and RUTLEDGE, JAMES T.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri May 04 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri May 04 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • Partial melting at the grain boundaries of mantle rock is a source of attenuation often invoked in the interpretation of teleseismic data. However, related experimental studies are extremely difficult and hence are scarce. We have used a convenient metallurgical system to model a rock sample with a layer of fluid at grain boundaries: the analog of the rock samples is a cylinder of fine-grained, pure aluminum (diameter is 6 cm; height is 6 cm), and the analog of the fluid is provided by a thin layer of aluminum-gallium eutectic at the grain boundaries. The metal gallium, liquid at room temperature,more » diffuses extremely rapidly into the grain boundaries of aluminum where it forms a soft eutectic that melts at 28[degrees]C. The total amount of gallium in the sample represents about 0.2 wt%. Ultrasonic (1 MHz) pulses were transmitted through the sample by a transducer, and the full waveform of the reflected and scattered signals, including the coda, were recorded. Analyses of the decay parameter of the coda envelope yield values of Q[sup [minus]1]. Preliminary results show that the thin film of aluminum-gallium eutectic at the grain boundaries noticeably increases attenuation. For pure aluminum at room temperature, Q[sup [minus]1] = 0.095 [times] 10[sup [minus]3]; after invasion of gallium into the grain boundaries, the value measured at 26[degrees]C (in solid state) was Q[sup [minus]1] = 0.62 [times] 10[sup [minus]3]; at 28[degrees]C, when the autectic became liquid, Q[sup [minus]1] = 1.01 [times] 10[sup [minus]3], an order of magnitude higher than for pure aluminum. 26 refs., 6 figs.« less
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  • This paper presents ways of estimating CO2 reductions of wind power using different methodologies. Estimates based on historical data have more pitfalls in methodology than estimates based on dispatch simulations. Taking into account exchange of electricity with neighboring regions is challenging for all methods. Results for CO2 emission reductions are shown from several countries. Wind power will reduce emissions for about 0.3-0.4 MtCO2/MWh when replacing mainly gas and up to 0.7 MtCO2/MWh when replacing mainly coal powered generation. The paper focuses on CO2 emissions from power system operation phase, but long term impacts are shortly discussed.
  • The seismic velocity and attenuation of P, S/sub perpendicular/ and S/sub parallel/ waves traveling through a sample of Westerly Granite as it was deformed to failure under a confining pressure of 500 bars were measured. All waves were propagated in a direction normal to the axis of maximum compression, with S/sub parallel/ polarized parallel to the axis and S/sub perpendicular/ polarized normal to it. All seismic velocities had decreased from 15 to 30 percent by the time failure occurred. The amplitudes of the S/sub perpendicular/ and P waves decreased by about 30 percent. A remarkable result of the experiment ismore » that the amplitude of the S/sub parallel/ wave increased throughout the experiment until near failure. The amplitude at 90 percent failure strength was more than twice the value under hydrostatic pressure alone. These results were explained by analyzing how modulus and dissipation due to frictional sliding at cracks are affected by the anisotropic crack distribution developed by the axial stress.« less