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Title: Microsatellite instability in prostate cancer

Abstract

Microsatellite instability (MIN) has been documented in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) as well as in sporadic forms of human cancers. Two of the genes which appear to be responsible for this particular tumor phenotype, hMSH2 and hMLH1, have now been identified. To determine the potential role of these mutator genes in prostate cancer, we have examined 95 prostate adenocarcinomas (40 paraffin embedded and 55 fresh frozen) for the presence of genetic instability at four microsatellite markers. The markers are localized to chromosome arms 5q(APC-CA1), 8p(Mfd 210Z), 15q(635/636), and 17q(p53-CA). Patients from whom paraffin embedded material was obtained were divided into short term (<3 years, n=18), and long term (>3 years, n=22) survivors. Of the 95 tumors examined, only four tumors (4%) demonstrated MIN: two tumors demonstrated MIN at 3 loci (p53-CA, APC-CA1, 635/636), one tumor demonstrated MIN at 2 loci (APC-CA1 and 635/636), and one tumor demonstrated instability at 635/636 only. All tumors exhibiting MIN had Gleason scores of {ge} 4+4. A correlation between MIN and survival was not observed. Information on family history was limited. However, of the two patients demonstrating MIN at three loci, one patient was diagnosed with a second malignancy (TCC of the ureter), butmore » otherwise had a negative family history, while the second patient had one first degree relative with esophageal cancer. The patient demonstrating MIN at two loci had a negative family history, while the remaining patient had two first degree relatives with cancer (prostate and stomach). These results suggest that hMSH2 and hMLH1 (as reflected by the small percentage of tumors displaying MIN) do not play a prominent role in the process of prostate tumorigenesis.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States) [and others
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
133573
Report Number(s):
CONF-941009-
Journal ID: AJHGAG; ISSN 0002-9297; TRN: 95:005313-0301
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: American Journal of Human Genetics; Journal Volume: 55; Journal Issue: Suppl.3; Conference: 44. annual meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics, Montreal (Canada), 18-22 Oct 1994; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; GENES; GENE MUTATIONS; INSTABILITY; CARCINOMAS; PATHOGENESIS; BIOLOGICAL MARKERS; PATIENTS; HEREDITARY DISEASES; PHENOTYPE; GENETICS; HUMAN CHROMOSOMES; CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS; GENETIC MAPPING; PROSTATE; STATISTICS

Citation Formats

Shan, A.L., Wick, M.J., and Persons, D.L. Microsatellite instability in prostate cancer. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Shan, A.L., Wick, M.J., & Persons, D.L. Microsatellite instability in prostate cancer. United States.
Shan, A.L., Wick, M.J., and Persons, D.L. Thu . "Microsatellite instability in prostate cancer". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_133573,
title = {Microsatellite instability in prostate cancer},
author = {Shan, A.L. and Wick, M.J. and Persons, D.L.},
abstractNote = {Microsatellite instability (MIN) has been documented in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) as well as in sporadic forms of human cancers. Two of the genes which appear to be responsible for this particular tumor phenotype, hMSH2 and hMLH1, have now been identified. To determine the potential role of these mutator genes in prostate cancer, we have examined 95 prostate adenocarcinomas (40 paraffin embedded and 55 fresh frozen) for the presence of genetic instability at four microsatellite markers. The markers are localized to chromosome arms 5q(APC-CA1), 8p(Mfd 210Z), 15q(635/636), and 17q(p53-CA). Patients from whom paraffin embedded material was obtained were divided into short term (<3 years, n=18), and long term (>3 years, n=22) survivors. Of the 95 tumors examined, only four tumors (4%) demonstrated MIN: two tumors demonstrated MIN at 3 loci (p53-CA, APC-CA1, 635/636), one tumor demonstrated MIN at 2 loci (APC-CA1 and 635/636), and one tumor demonstrated instability at 635/636 only. All tumors exhibiting MIN had Gleason scores of {ge} 4+4. A correlation between MIN and survival was not observed. Information on family history was limited. However, of the two patients demonstrating MIN at three loci, one patient was diagnosed with a second malignancy (TCC of the ureter), but otherwise had a negative family history, while the second patient had one first degree relative with esophageal cancer. The patient demonstrating MIN at two loci had a negative family history, while the remaining patient had two first degree relatives with cancer (prostate and stomach). These results suggest that hMSH2 and hMLH1 (as reflected by the small percentage of tumors displaying MIN) do not play a prominent role in the process of prostate tumorigenesis.},
doi = {},
journal = {American Journal of Human Genetics},
number = Suppl.3,
volume = 55,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1994},
month = {Thu Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1994}
}
  • Microsatellite instability was first demonstrated to be a common underlying mechanism in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and has recently been implicated in the development of several other human cancers. Although numerous genetic changes have been documented in ovarian cancer, their molecular bases are poorly understood. In investigating the molecular genetics of ovarian cancer, we analyzed twelve short tandem repeats that were amplified by PCR from DNA of 48 tumors and their corresponding lymphocyte samples. All of the 48 cases studied have no noticeable family history and, of them, 42 are epithelial (benign/borderline, 5; grade I, 4; GII, 4; GIII,more » 29) and 6 are nonepithelial. A microsatellite instability has been shown to be inversely correlated with the occurrence of allelic losses, half of those cases chosen have a fractional allele loss of {le}15 (median = .18 of 50 tumors tested for 86 loci from every chromosomal arm). The loci examined included eight dinucleotide repeats (D2S123, D9S104, D10S197, D11S904, D16S408, D16S421, D17S250, and D17S579), two trinucleotide repeats (DM and AR) and two tetranucleotide repeats (DXS981 and VWF). Despite the fact that HNPCC phenotype includes ovarian cancer and that microsatellite instability has been shown in one ovarian cancer from an HNPCC family, the allele sizes of 12 loci were found to be identical in all paired tumor and normal samples we studied except for one tumor at a single locus. The band shift displayed on polyacrylamide gel representing an additional allele of VWF was only observed in one grade III tumor. Our results are thus a strong indication that the alteration of microsatellite repeats may not play a major role in the development of sporadic ovarian cancer.« less
  • In order to detect regions of DNA containing tumor suppressor genes involved in the development of gastric cancer, we evaluated loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in 78 gastric adenocarcinomas. A total of 46 microsatellite markers were employed, which detected at least one site per arm of each autosome in the human genome, including several markers linked to known tumor suppressor genes (TP53, APC, DCC, RB1, and BRCA1). We detected elevated rates of LOH at D3S1478 on chromosome 3p21 (44%, or 22 of 50 cases), at D12S78 at 12q14q24.33 (39%), and 37% at D9S157 on 9p, three sites not previously known tomore » be affected in gastric cancer. Another locus on chromosome 12q, D12S97, showed LOH in 40% of informative cases. LOH was detected on chromosome 17p near TP53 in 66% of informative cases (23 of 35). Microsatellite instability (MI) was observed in 22% of the cancers. Tumors varied greatly in percentage of sites exhibiting MI, from 0% to 77% of sites tested. These findings expand the description of the genetic lesions occurring in gastric cancer.« less
  • The phenomenon of microsatellite instability recently has been described in colon cancer. However, little attention has been given as to whether different microsatellites have different degrees of instability in cancer patients. We selected a total of 14 microsatellite loci (5 di-, 3 tri-, 6 tetranucleotide) supposed to have different mutation rates in vivo, and spread over 8 different chromosomes. The above microsatellites were typed by PCR analysis of DNA from a total of over 200 paraffin-embedded colon tumors and corresponding normal tissue. None of these patients have an obvious family history of cancer and thus we assumed all tumors weremore » sporadic. Comparison of normal and colon cancer tissues revealed somatic mutations for each of the selected microsatellites. The proportion of patients with instability for any given locus varies from 4.5% to 19.3%, with tetranucleotide repeats having the highest average frequency. In addition, a greater fraction of tumors showed instability in at least 1 locus than previously has been reported, possibly signifying a baseline microsatellite instability in all colon cancers. For cases demonstrating instability at 1 or more loci, we analyzed additional microsatellite loci. We then grouped patients based on the number of loci that showed instability. In order to investigate patterns of instability, we also scored the size of somatic mutations occurring in cancer tissue.« less
  • Colorectal tumor DNA was examined for somatic instability at (CA)[sub n] repeats on human chromosomes 5q, 15q, 17p, and 18q. Differences between tumor and normal DNA were detected in 25 of the 90 (28 percent) tumors examined. This instability appeared as either a substantial change in repeat length (often heterogeneous in nature) or a minor change (typically two base pairs). Microsatellite instability was significantly correlated with the tumor's location in the proximal colon (P = 0.003), with increased patient survival (P = 0.02), and, inversely, with loss of heterozygosity for chromosomes 5q, 17p, and 18q. These data suggest that somemore » colorectal cancers may arise through a mechanism that does not necessarily involve loss of heterozygosity. 23 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.« less
  • Purpose: To elucidate whether microsatellite instability (MSI) predicts clinical outcome in radiation-treated endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC). Methods and Materials: A consecutive series of 93 patients with EEC treated with extrafascial hysterectomy and postoperative radiotherapy was studied. The median clinical follow-up of patients was 138 months, with a maximum of 232 months. Five quasimonomorphic mononucleotide markers (BAT-25, BAT-26, NR21, NR24, and NR27) were used for MSI classification. Results: Twenty-five patients (22%) were classified as MSI. Both in the whole series and in early stages (I and II), univariate analysis showed a significant association between MSI and poorer 10-year local disease-free survival,more » disease-free survival, and cancer-specific survival. In multivariate analysis, MSI was excluded from the final regression model in the whole series, but in early stages MSI provided additional significant predictive information independent of traditional prognostic and predictive factors (age, stage, grade, and vascular invasion) for disease-free survival (hazard ratio [HR] 3.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-10.49; p = 0.048) and cancer-specific survival (HR 4.20, 95% CI 1.23-14.35; p = 0.022) and was marginally significant for local disease-free survival (HR 3.54, 95% CI 0.93-13.46; p = 0.064). Conclusions: These results suggest that MSI may predict radiotherapy response in early-stage EEC.« less