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Title: Deformation mechanisms of nanotwinned Al

Abstract

The objective of this project is to investigate the role of different types of layer interfaces on the formation of high density stacking fault (SF) in Al in Al/fcc multilayers, and understand the corresponding deformation mechanisms of the films. Stacking faults or twins can be intentionally introduced (via growth) into certain fcc metals with low stacking fault energy (such as Cu, Ag and 330 stainless steels) to achieve high strength, high ductility, superior thermal stability and good electrical conductivity. However it is still a major challenge to synthesize these types of defects into metals with high stacking fault energy, such as Al. Although deformation twins have been observed in some nanocrystalline Al powders by low temperature, high strain rate cryomilling or in Al at the edge of crack tip or indentation (with the assistance of high stress intensity factor), these deformation techniques typically introduce twins sporadically and the control of deformation twin density in Al is still not feasible. This project is designed to test the following hypotheses: (1) Certain type of layer interfaces may assist the formation of SF in Al, (2) Al with high density SF may have deformation mechanisms drastically different from those of coarse-grained Al andmore » nanotwinned Cu. To test these hypotheses, we have performed the following tasks: (i) Investigate the influence of layer interfaces, stresses and deposition parameters on the formation and density of SF in Al. (ii) Understand the role of SF on the deformation behavior of Al. In situ nanoindentation experiments will be performed to probe deformation mechanisms in Al. The major findings related to the formation mechanism of twins and mechanical behavior of nanotwinned metals include the followings: 1) Our studies show that nanotwins can be introduced into metals with high stacking fault energy, in drastic contrast to the general anticipation. 2) We show two strategies that can effectively introduce growth twins in high-stacking-energy metals: use Ag as a template to introduce high density growth twins in epitaxial Al; and the film thickness is important in determination of volume fraction of growth twins. 3) We prove that high density twin boundaries can lead to significant work hardening capability in nanotwinned Al. We have published 13 articles, including Nature Communications, Nano Letters, and two review articles, one in Annual Review of Materials Research; and one in MRS Bulletin. Two postdocs and three graduate students have worked on the project. Two of them have become postdoc at Sandia National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. One of the postdoc has become a faculty at a University. One patent has been filed.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1331877
Report Number(s):
Finalprojectreport
TRN: US1800484
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0010482
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; STACKING FAULTS; STAINLESS STEELS; DEFORMATION; STRAINS; Nanotwin; mechanical behavior; deformation mechanism; Al alloys; in situ; nanoindentation

Citation Formats

Zhang, Xinghang. Deformation mechanisms of nanotwinned Al. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1331877.
Zhang, Xinghang. Deformation mechanisms of nanotwinned Al. United States. doi:10.2172/1331877.
Zhang, Xinghang. Thu . "Deformation mechanisms of nanotwinned Al". United States. doi:10.2172/1331877. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1331877.
@article{osti_1331877,
title = {Deformation mechanisms of nanotwinned Al},
author = {Zhang, Xinghang},
abstractNote = {The objective of this project is to investigate the role of different types of layer interfaces on the formation of high density stacking fault (SF) in Al in Al/fcc multilayers, and understand the corresponding deformation mechanisms of the films. Stacking faults or twins can be intentionally introduced (via growth) into certain fcc metals with low stacking fault energy (such as Cu, Ag and 330 stainless steels) to achieve high strength, high ductility, superior thermal stability and good electrical conductivity. However it is still a major challenge to synthesize these types of defects into metals with high stacking fault energy, such as Al. Although deformation twins have been observed in some nanocrystalline Al powders by low temperature, high strain rate cryomilling or in Al at the edge of crack tip or indentation (with the assistance of high stress intensity factor), these deformation techniques typically introduce twins sporadically and the control of deformation twin density in Al is still not feasible. This project is designed to test the following hypotheses: (1) Certain type of layer interfaces may assist the formation of SF in Al, (2) Al with high density SF may have deformation mechanisms drastically different from those of coarse-grained Al and nanotwinned Cu. To test these hypotheses, we have performed the following tasks: (i) Investigate the influence of layer interfaces, stresses and deposition parameters on the formation and density of SF in Al. (ii) Understand the role of SF on the deformation behavior of Al. In situ nanoindentation experiments will be performed to probe deformation mechanisms in Al. The major findings related to the formation mechanism of twins and mechanical behavior of nanotwinned metals include the followings: 1) Our studies show that nanotwins can be introduced into metals with high stacking fault energy, in drastic contrast to the general anticipation. 2) We show two strategies that can effectively introduce growth twins in high-stacking-energy metals: use Ag as a template to introduce high density growth twins in epitaxial Al; and the film thickness is important in determination of volume fraction of growth twins. 3) We prove that high density twin boundaries can lead to significant work hardening capability in nanotwinned Al. We have published 13 articles, including Nature Communications, Nano Letters, and two review articles, one in Annual Review of Materials Research; and one in MRS Bulletin. Two postdocs and three graduate students have worked on the project. Two of them have become postdoc at Sandia National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. One of the postdoc has become a faculty at a University. One patent has been filed.},
doi = {10.2172/1331877},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {11}
}