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Title: Data Report for Monitoring at Six West Virginia Marcellus Shale Development Sites using NETL’s Mobile Air Monitoring Laboratory (July–November 2012)

Abstract

The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection’s Office of Oil and Gas was directed according to the Natural Gas Horizontal Well Control Act of December 14, 2011 (West Virginia Code §22-6A) to conduct studies of horizontal well drilling activities related to air quality. The planned study, “Noise, Light, Dust, Volatile Organic Compounds Related to Well Location Restrictions,” required determination of the effectiveness of a 625 ft minimum set-back from the center of the pad of a horizontal well drilling site to the nearest occupied dwelling. An investigation was conducted at seven drilling sites by West Virginia University (WVU) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to collect data on dust, hydrocarbon compounds and on noise, radiation, and light levels. NETL’s role in this study was to collect measurements of ambient pollutant concentrations at six of the seven selected sites using NETL’s Mobile Air Monitoring Laboratory. The trailer-based laboratory was situated a distance of 492–1,312 ft from each well pad, on which activities included well pad construction, vertical drilling, horizontal drilling, hydraulic fracturing, and flaring, with the objective of evaluating the air quality impact of each activity for 1–4 weeks per site. Measured pollutants included volatile organic compounds (VOCs), coarse andmore » fine particulate matter (PM 10 and PM 2.5, respectively), ozone, methane (CH 4), carbon dioxide (CO 2), carbon isotopes of CH 4 and CO 2, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), and sulfur dioxide (SO 2).« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3]
  1. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)
  2. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United Stat
  3. Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States). In-house Research
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1330216
Report Number(s):
NETL-PUB-20513; NETL-TRS-4-2016
TRN: US1700437
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; METHANE; CARBON DIOXIDE; SULFUR DIOXIDE; WELL DRILLING; WEST VIRGINIA; CARBON; VOLATILE MATTER; VISIBLE RADIATION; SHALES; AIR QUALITY; AIR POLLUTION MONITORING; NATURAL GAS; NITROGEN OXIDES; CARBON ISOTOPES; CONCENTRATION RATIO; HYDRAULIC FRACTURING; PARTICULATES; POLLUTANTS; ABUNDANCE; CONSTRUCTION; FLARING; OZONE; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; fossil fuels

Citation Formats

Pekney, Natalie J., Reeder, Matthew, Veloski, Garret A., and Diehl, J. Rodney. Data Report for Monitoring at Six West Virginia Marcellus Shale Development Sites using NETL’s Mobile Air Monitoring Laboratory (July–November 2012). United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1330216.
Pekney, Natalie J., Reeder, Matthew, Veloski, Garret A., & Diehl, J. Rodney. Data Report for Monitoring at Six West Virginia Marcellus Shale Development Sites using NETL’s Mobile Air Monitoring Laboratory (July–November 2012). United States. doi:10.2172/1330216.
Pekney, Natalie J., Reeder, Matthew, Veloski, Garret A., and Diehl, J. Rodney. Thu . "Data Report for Monitoring at Six West Virginia Marcellus Shale Development Sites using NETL’s Mobile Air Monitoring Laboratory (July–November 2012)". United States. doi:10.2172/1330216. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1330216.
@article{osti_1330216,
title = {Data Report for Monitoring at Six West Virginia Marcellus Shale Development Sites using NETL’s Mobile Air Monitoring Laboratory (July–November 2012)},
author = {Pekney, Natalie J. and Reeder, Matthew and Veloski, Garret A. and Diehl, J. Rodney},
abstractNote = {The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection’s Office of Oil and Gas was directed according to the Natural Gas Horizontal Well Control Act of December 14, 2011 (West Virginia Code §22-6A) to conduct studies of horizontal well drilling activities related to air quality. The planned study, “Noise, Light, Dust, Volatile Organic Compounds Related to Well Location Restrictions,” required determination of the effectiveness of a 625 ft minimum set-back from the center of the pad of a horizontal well drilling site to the nearest occupied dwelling. An investigation was conducted at seven drilling sites by West Virginia University (WVU) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to collect data on dust, hydrocarbon compounds and on noise, radiation, and light levels. NETL’s role in this study was to collect measurements of ambient pollutant concentrations at six of the seven selected sites using NETL’s Mobile Air Monitoring Laboratory. The trailer-based laboratory was situated a distance of 492–1,312 ft from each well pad, on which activities included well pad construction, vertical drilling, horizontal drilling, hydraulic fracturing, and flaring, with the objective of evaluating the air quality impact of each activity for 1–4 weeks per site. Measured pollutants included volatile organic compounds (VOCs), coarse and fine particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5, respectively), ozone, methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon isotopes of CH4 and CO2, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), and sulfur dioxide (SO2).},
doi = {10.2172/1330216},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 16 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Thu Jun 16 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The area of historic gas production in southwestern West Virginia has produced gas and minor oil for decades; has thick sequences of black shale; and has relatively broad, low-relief structures that generally trend northeast-to-southwest. The emerging area to the north (Pleasants, Wood, Ritchie, Calhoun, Wirt, and Roane Counties) has experienced appreciable oil in addition to gas production; has many siltstone units interbedded with the Devonian shales; lacks black shale in the eastern counties; and is dominated structurally by a north-south trending anticline that marks the western edge of a detached thrust sheet emplaced from the east. The authors' work hasmore » refined and clarified many stratigraphic relationships within the shales and equivalents to the east. On the basis of maps of cumulative production, and the stratigraphic distribution of shows, they concluded that black shales served as a source of gas, some of which migrated into surrounding rocks. In the historic area, where siltstones are rare or absent, some gas migrated to a number of intervals, but most stayed within the black shales. In the emerging area, most gas migrated to siltstone bundles. Although conventional stimulation methods differ marginally in how they affect cumulative production, adjusting for time, shot wells have done better than wells stimulated by the other most commonly used methods.« less
  • The Huron Shale Member is the major Devonian shale producing zone in all counties under study. To the north and east, the organic shales of the Huron are replaced by inorganic shales and siltstones; gas production in these areas probably comes from the entire shale interval. Gas-producing potential of the Rhinestreet has not been fully exploited despite its similar lithologic character to the Huron. Structure maps on the top of the Berea and base of the Huron show two northeast-to-southwest trending synclines in Cabell and Wayne Counties, and a north-south anticline in Cabell County. Berea and Onondaga structure maps revealmore » benches at both levels in Jackson, Mason, and Putnam Counties, possibly indicating continued effects of normal faulting throughout the shale interval. The Huron and Rhinestreet Members display the largest ratio of shows to penetrations in Devonian shale wells in southwestern West Virginia, confirming the role of the Huron in total shale gas production, and emphasizing the potential of the deeper Rhinestreet Member. Smoothed maps of initial potentials are appropriate in the study of regional trends, but unreliable for precise estimation of gas volumes at individual locations. Maps of initial potentials show sets of linearities parallel and perpendicular to regional structural trends. These linearities implicate fractures as a control on gas volumes.« less
  • An oil and gas report on Pleasants, Wood, and Ritchie Counties was written and is under review. It includes sections on stratigraphy, structure, drilling history, production, and completion methods, as well as structure contour maps, maps of wells producing in major intervals, and interlocking cross-sections. A similar report was written in part for Wirt, Roane, and Calhoun Counties, and preliminary studies were begun for a report on Mingo, Logan, and Lincoln Counties, including maps of gas initial potentials and probability of success. A data base of production, stratigraphy, pays, and completion technology was created in part, and some data inmore » a master oil and gas data base were edited and corrected for transfer to the Devonian shale data base. Computer software was developed for geostatistical calculations and mapping, display of well locations, display of stratigraphic data and occurrences of shows and pays, assignment of pays to stratigraphic intervals, editing of data, and data input.« less