skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: The role of manufacturing in affecting the social dimension of sustainability

Abstract

Manufacturing affects all three dimensions of sustainability: economy, environment, and society. This paper addresses the last of these dimensions. It explores social impacts identified by national level social indicators, frameworks, and principles. The effects of manufacturing on social performance are framed for different stakeholder groups with associated social needs. Methodology development as well as various challenges for social life cycle assessment (S-LCA) are further examined. Efforts to integrate social and another dimension of sustainability are considered, with attention to globalization challenges, including offshoring and reshoring. The study concludes with a summary of key takeaways and promising directions for future work.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [4];  [5];  [5]
  1. Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)
  2. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)
  3. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
  4. Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark)
  5. ETH Zurich (Switzerland)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1326218
Report Number(s):
SAND-2016-5815J
Journal ID: ISSN 0007-8506; PII: S0007850616301901; TRN: US1700153
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
CIRP Annals
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 65; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 0007-8506
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; lifecycle; human aspect; social sustainability

Citation Formats

Sutherland, John W., Richter, Justin S., Hutchins, Margot J., Dornfeld, David, Dzombak, Rachel, Mangold, Jennifer, Robinson, Stefanie, Hauschild, Michael Z., Bonou, Alexandra, Schönsleben, Paul, and Friemann, Felix. The role of manufacturing in affecting the social dimension of sustainability. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.cirp.2016.05.003.
Sutherland, John W., Richter, Justin S., Hutchins, Margot J., Dornfeld, David, Dzombak, Rachel, Mangold, Jennifer, Robinson, Stefanie, Hauschild, Michael Z., Bonou, Alexandra, Schönsleben, Paul, & Friemann, Felix. The role of manufacturing in affecting the social dimension of sustainability. United States. doi:10.1016/j.cirp.2016.05.003.
Sutherland, John W., Richter, Justin S., Hutchins, Margot J., Dornfeld, David, Dzombak, Rachel, Mangold, Jennifer, Robinson, Stefanie, Hauschild, Michael Z., Bonou, Alexandra, Schönsleben, Paul, and Friemann, Felix. Wed . "The role of manufacturing in affecting the social dimension of sustainability". United States. doi:10.1016/j.cirp.2016.05.003. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1326218.
@article{osti_1326218,
title = {The role of manufacturing in affecting the social dimension of sustainability},
author = {Sutherland, John W. and Richter, Justin S. and Hutchins, Margot J. and Dornfeld, David and Dzombak, Rachel and Mangold, Jennifer and Robinson, Stefanie and Hauschild, Michael Z. and Bonou, Alexandra and Schönsleben, Paul and Friemann, Felix},
abstractNote = {Manufacturing affects all three dimensions of sustainability: economy, environment, and society. This paper addresses the last of these dimensions. It explores social impacts identified by national level social indicators, frameworks, and principles. The effects of manufacturing on social performance are framed for different stakeholder groups with associated social needs. Methodology development as well as various challenges for social life cycle assessment (S-LCA) are further examined. Efforts to integrate social and another dimension of sustainability are considered, with attention to globalization challenges, including offshoring and reshoring. The study concludes with a summary of key takeaways and promising directions for future work.},
doi = {10.1016/j.cirp.2016.05.003},
journal = {CIRP Annals},
number = 2,
volume = 65,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Aug 03 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Aug 03 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 4works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share:
  • Currently, there is no standard method to assess the complex systems in rangeland ecosystems. Decision makers need baselines to create a common language of current rangeland conditions and standards for continued rangeland assessment. The Sustainable Rangeland Roundtable (SRR), a group of private and public organizations and agencies, has created a forum to discuss rangeland sustainability and assessment. The SRR has worked to integrate social, economic, and ecological disciplines related to rangelands and has identified a standard set of indicators that can be used to assess rangeland sustainability. As part of this process, SRR has developed a two-tiered conceptual framework frommore » a systems perspective to study the validity of indicators and the relationships among them. The first tier categorizes rangeland characteristics into four states. The second tier defines processes affecting these states through time and space. The framework clearly shows that the processes affect and are affected by each other.« less
  • This article describes the requirements of EO 13514, how PNNL has implemented this mandate and how it has affected the Sustainability Program at PNNL, and makes recommendations about the EO as an effective framework for setting sustainability policy and programs at other institutions.
  • Social sustainability assessment of capture fisheries is, both in terms of method development and measurement, not well developed. The objective of this study, therefore, was to develop a method consisting of indicators and rubrics (i.e. categories that articulate levels of performance) to assess social sustainability of capture fisheries. This method was applied to a Norwegian trawler that targets cod and haddock in the northeast Atlantic. Based on previous research, 13 social sustainability issues were selected. To measure the state of these issues, 17 process and outcome indicators were determined. To interpret indicator values, rubrics were developed for each indicator, usingmore » standards set by international conventions or data retrieved from national statistics, industry agreements or scientific publications that explore rubric scales. The indicators and rubrics were subsequently used in a social sustainability assessment of a Norwegian trawler. This assessment indicated that overall, social sustainability of this trawler is relatively high, with high rubric scores, for example, for worker safety, provisions aboard for the crew and companies' salary levels. The assessment also indicated that the trawler could improve on healthy working environment, product freshness and fish welfare during capture. This application demonstrated that our method provides insight into social sustainability at the level of the vessel and can be used to identify potential room for improvement. This method is also promising for social sustainability assessment of other capture fisheries. - Highlights: • A method was developed for social sustainability assessment of capture fisheries. • This method entailed determining outcome and process indicators for important issues. • To interpret indicator values, a rubric was developed for each indicator. • Use of this method gives insight into social sustainability and improvement options. • This method is promising for social sustainability assessment of capture fisheries.« less
  • Organizations, both public and private sector, are increasingly pursuing strategies to reduce their energy use and increase sustainability. Whether these efforts are based on economic rationale, community spirit, environmental ethics, federal mandates, or other reasons, they predominantly feature strategies that rely on new technologies. If there is any focus on behavior change, it is typically addressed to changing individual behavior. While we recognize the importance—and limitations—of the role of individual behavior in promoting sustainability goals, we are more interested in the role of institutional behavior. We have reviewed the small but growing literature on institutional behavior change, and have identifiedmore » eight “evidence-based” principles as a guide for federal agencies to take action. This article presents the principles and illustrates them with examples to suggest ways that they can serve as models for others.« less
  • Organizations, both public and private sector, are increasingly pursuing strategies to reduce their energy use and increase sustainability. Whether these efforts are based on economic rationale, community spirit, environmental ethics, federal mandates, or other reasons, they predominantly feature strategies that rely on new technologies. If there is any focus on behavior change, it is typically addressed to changing individual behavior. While we recognize the importance and limitations of the role of individual behavior in promoting sustainability goals, we are more interested in the role of institutional behavior. We have reviewed the small but growing literature on institutional behavior change, andmore » have identified eight evidence-based principles as a guide for federal agencies to take action. This article presents the principles and illustrates them with examples to suggest ways that they can serve as models for others.« less