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Title: Determination of errors in derived magnetic field directions in geosynchronous orbit: results from a statistical approach

Abstract

Our study aims to statistically estimate the errors in local magnetic field directions that are derived from electron directional distributions measured by Los Alamos National Laboratory geosynchronous (LANL GEO) satellites. First, by comparing derived and measured magnetic field directions along the GEO orbit to those calculated from three selected empirical global magnetic field models (including a static Olson and Pfitzer 1977 quiet magnetic field model, a simple dynamic Tsyganenko 1989 model, and a sophisticated dynamic Tsyganenko 2001 storm model), it is shown that the errors in both derived and modeled directions are at least comparable. Furthermore, using a newly developed proxy method as well as comparing results from empirical models, we are able to provide for the first time circumstantial evidence showing that derived magnetic field directions should statistically match the real magnetic directions better, with averaged errors < ~2°, than those from the three empirical models with averaged errors > ~5°. In addition, our results suggest that the errors in derived magnetic field directions do not depend much on magnetospheric activity, in contrast to the empirical field models. Finally, as applications of the above conclusions, we show examples of electron pitch angle distributions observed by LANL GEO and alsomore » take the derived magnetic field directions as the real ones so as to test the performance of empirical field models along the GEO orbits, with results suggesting dependence on solar cycles as well as satellite locations. Finally, this study demonstrates the validity and value of the method that infers local magnetic field directions from particle spin-resolved distributions.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1325839
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-15-27475
Journal ID: ISSN 1432-0576
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396; Internal Funding
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Annales Geophysicae (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Annales Geophysicae (Online); Journal Volume: 34; Journal Issue: 9; Journal ID: ISSN 1432-0576
Publisher:
European Geophysical Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; magnetospheric physics; energetic particles trapped; storms and substorms; intruments and techniques

Citation Formats

Chen, Yue, Cunningham, Gregory, and Henderson, Michael. Determination of errors in derived magnetic field directions in geosynchronous orbit: results from a statistical approach. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.5194/angeo-34-831-2016.
Chen, Yue, Cunningham, Gregory, & Henderson, Michael. Determination of errors in derived magnetic field directions in geosynchronous orbit: results from a statistical approach. United States. doi:10.5194/angeo-34-831-2016.
Chen, Yue, Cunningham, Gregory, and Henderson, Michael. 2016. "Determination of errors in derived magnetic field directions in geosynchronous orbit: results from a statistical approach". United States. doi:10.5194/angeo-34-831-2016.
@article{osti_1325839,
title = {Determination of errors in derived magnetic field directions in geosynchronous orbit: results from a statistical approach},
author = {Chen, Yue and Cunningham, Gregory and Henderson, Michael},
abstractNote = {Our study aims to statistically estimate the errors in local magnetic field directions that are derived from electron directional distributions measured by Los Alamos National Laboratory geosynchronous (LANL GEO) satellites. First, by comparing derived and measured magnetic field directions along the GEO orbit to those calculated from three selected empirical global magnetic field models (including a static Olson and Pfitzer 1977 quiet magnetic field model, a simple dynamic Tsyganenko 1989 model, and a sophisticated dynamic Tsyganenko 2001 storm model), it is shown that the errors in both derived and modeled directions are at least comparable. Furthermore, using a newly developed proxy method as well as comparing results from empirical models, we are able to provide for the first time circumstantial evidence showing that derived magnetic field directions should statistically match the real magnetic directions better, with averaged errors < ~2°, than those from the three empirical models with averaged errors > ~5°. In addition, our results suggest that the errors in derived magnetic field directions do not depend much on magnetospheric activity, in contrast to the empirical field models. Finally, as applications of the above conclusions, we show examples of electron pitch angle distributions observed by LANL GEO and also take the derived magnetic field directions as the real ones so as to test the performance of empirical field models along the GEO orbits, with results suggesting dependence on solar cycles as well as satellite locations. Finally, this study demonstrates the validity and value of the method that infers local magnetic field directions from particle spin-resolved distributions.},
doi = {10.5194/angeo-34-831-2016},
journal = {Annales Geophysicae (Online)},
number = 9,
volume = 34,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.5194/angeo-34-831-2016

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  • Our study aims to statistically estimate the errors in local magnetic field directions that are derived from electron directional distributions measured by Los Alamos National Laboratory geosynchronous (LANL GEO) satellites. First, by comparing derived and measured magnetic field directions along the GEO orbit to those calculated from three selected empirical global magnetic field models (including a static Olson and Pfitzer 1977 quiet magnetic field model, a simple dynamic Tsyganenko 1989 model, and a sophisticated dynamic Tsyganenko 2001 storm model), it is shown that the errors in both derived and modeled directions are at least comparable. Furthermore, using a newly developedmore » proxy method as well as comparing results from empirical models, we are able to provide for the first time circumstantial evidence showing that derived magnetic field directions should statistically match the real magnetic directions better, with averaged errors < ~2°, than those from the three empirical models with averaged errors > ~5°. In addition, our results suggest that the errors in derived magnetic field directions do not depend much on magnetospheric activity, in contrast to the empirical field models. Finally, as applications of the above conclusions, we show examples of electron pitch angle distributions observed by LANL GEO and also take the derived magnetic field directions as the real ones so as to test the performance of empirical field models along the GEO orbits, with results suggesting dependence on solar cycles as well as satellite locations. Finally, this study demonstrates the validity and value of the method that infers local magnetic field directions from particle spin-resolved distributions.« less
  • The authors present a statistical survey of Prognoz 10 solar wind observations at the times of transient (step function and impulsive) variations in the dayside magnetospheric magnetic field strength measured by the GOES 5 and 6 geosynchronous satellites. The results indicate that 51% of the transient magnetospheric events can be associated with corresponding variations in the solar wind dynamic pressure. A further 17% of the events can be associated with fluctuations in the interplanetary magnetic field orientation in the sense previously associated with foreshock pressure pulses. The authors find no tendency for impulsive events at dayside geosynchronous orbit to bemore » associated with north/south fluctuations in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation, nor for the events to occur primarily during intervals of southward IMF. The success rate for associating transient events at dayside geosynchronous orbit with solar wind features decreases as Prognoz 10 moves farther from the Earth-Sun line. The observations indicate that variations in the solar wind dynamic pressure and foreshock pressure pulses associated with variations in the IMF cone angle are the predominant causes of large-amplitude transient events observed at dayside geosynchronous orbit. 65 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.« less
  • Knowledge of the plasma fluxes at geosynchronous orbit is important to both scientific and operational investigations. We present a new empirical model of the ion flux and the electron flux at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) in the energy range ~1 eV to ~40 keV. The model is based on a total of 82 satellite-years of observations from the Magnetospheric Plasma Analyzer instruments on Los Alamos National Laboratory satellites at GEO. These data are assigned to a fixed grid of 24 local-times and 40 energies, at all possible values of Kp. Bi-linear interpolation is used between grid points to provide the ionmore » flux and the electron flux values at any energy and local-time, and for given values of geomagnetic activity (proxied by the 3-hour Kp index), and also for given values of solar activity (proxied by the daily F10.7 index). Initial comparison of the electron flux from the model with data from a Compact Environmental Anomaly Sensor II (CEASE-II), also located at geosynchronous orbit, indicate a good match during both quiet and disturbed periods. The model is available for distribution as a FORTRAN code that can be modified to suit user-requirements.« less
  • In this paper the authors examine the relationship between geosynchronous magnetic field variations during substorms measured by GOES 5 and the auroral electrojet as measured by AE and Poste de la Baleine. As in previous studies, the authors find that the more taillike the field prior to the local onset, the greater the dipolarization of the field during the substorm. They also find that the greater the deviation of the field from a dipolar configuration, the larger the change in AE during the event. This implies that stronger cross-tail currents prior to the substorm are associated with larger substorm-associated westwardmore » electrojets and thus more intense substorms. Previous work has shown that in order to produce the observed taillike fields at geosynchronous altitude, the intense cross-tail current that builds up during the growth phase must be localized in the near-Earth ([le] 10 R[sub E]) region. Since the westward electrojet is the ionospheric leg of the substorm current wedge, this result implies that the substorm-associated westward electrojet is drawn from the near-Earth region. In fact, the authors find that most of the current diversion occurs in the near-Earth magnetotail. Furthermore, they estimate that a diversion about half of the near-Earth cross-tail current can account for the current in the northern and southern westward electrojets associated with the substorm current wedge. 25 refs., 9 figs.« less
  • Any canonical transformation of Hamiltonian equations is symplectic, and any area-preserving transformation in 2D is a symplectomorphism. Based on these, a discrete symplectic map and its continuous symplectic analog are derived for forward magnetic field line trajectories in natural canonical coordinates. The unperturbed axisymmetric Hamiltonian for magnetic field lines is constructed from the experimental data in the DIII-D [J. L. Luxon and L. E. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)]. The equilibrium Hamiltonian is a highly accurate, analytic, and realistic representation of the magnetic geometry of the DIII-D. These symplectic mathematical maps are used to calculate the magnetic footprint onmore » the inboard collector plate in the DIII-D. Internal statistical topological noise and field errors are irreducible and ubiquitous in magnetic confinement schemes for fusion. It is important to know the stochasticity and magnetic footprint from noise and error fields. The estimates of the spectrum and mode amplitudes of the spatial topological noise and magnetic errors in the DIII-D are used as magnetic perturbation. The discrete and continuous symplectic maps are used to calculate the magnetic footprint on the inboard collector plate of the DIII-D by inverting the natural coordinates to physical coordinates. The combination of highly accurate equilibrium generating function, natural canonical coordinates, symplecticity, and small step-size together gives a very accurate calculation of magnetic footprint. Radial variation of magnetic perturbation and the response of plasma to perturbation are not included. The inboard footprint from noise and errors are dominated by m=3, n=1 mode. The footprint is in the form of a toroidally winding helical strip. The width of stochastic layer scales as (1/2) power of amplitude. The area of footprint scales as first power of amplitude. The physical parameters such as toroidal angle, length, and poloidal angle covered before striking, and the safety factor all have fractal structure. The average field diffusion near the X-point for lines that strike and that do not strike differs by about three to four orders of magnitude. The magnetic footprint gives the maximal bounds on size and heat flux density on collector plate.« less