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Title: Terminology Guideline for Classifying Offshore Wind Energy Resources

Abstract

The purpose of this guideline is to establish a clear and consistent vocabulary for conveying offshore wind resource potential and to interpret this vocabulary in terms that are familiar to the oil and gas (O&G) industry. This involves clarifying and refining existing definitions of offshore wind energy resource classes. The terminology developed in this guideline represents one of several possible sets of vocabulary that may differ with respect to their purpose, data availability, and comprehensiveness. It was customized to correspond with established offshore wind practices and existing renewable energy industry terminology (e.g. DOE 2013, Brown et al. 2015) while conforming to established fossil resource classification as best as possible. The developers of the guideline recognize the fundamental differences that exist between fossil and renewable energy resources with respect to availability, accessibility, lifetime, and quality. Any quantitative comparison between fossil and renewable energy resources, including offshore wind, is therefore limited. For instance, O&G resources are finite and there may be significant uncertainty associated with the amount of the resource. In contrast, aboveground renewable resources, such as offshore wind, do not generally deplete over time but can vary significantly subhourly, daily, seasonally, and annually. The intent of this guideline is to makemore » these differences transparent and develop an offshore wind resource classification that conforms to established fossil resource classifications where possible. This guideline also provides methods to quantitatively compare certain offshore wind energy resources to O&G resource classes for specific applications. Finally, this guideline identifies areas where analogies to established O&G terminology may be inappropriate or subject to misinterpretation.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1324535
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-6A20-65431
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; offshore wind terminology; wind resource potential; definitions; wind resource classes; NREL

Citation Formats

Beiter, Philipp, and Musial, Walt. Terminology Guideline for Classifying Offshore Wind Energy Resources. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1324535.
Beiter, Philipp, & Musial, Walt. Terminology Guideline for Classifying Offshore Wind Energy Resources. United States. doi:10.2172/1324535.
Beiter, Philipp, and Musial, Walt. 2016. "Terminology Guideline for Classifying Offshore Wind Energy Resources". United States. doi:10.2172/1324535. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1324535.
@article{osti_1324535,
title = {Terminology Guideline for Classifying Offshore Wind Energy Resources},
author = {Beiter, Philipp and Musial, Walt},
abstractNote = {The purpose of this guideline is to establish a clear and consistent vocabulary for conveying offshore wind resource potential and to interpret this vocabulary in terms that are familiar to the oil and gas (O&G) industry. This involves clarifying and refining existing definitions of offshore wind energy resource classes. The terminology developed in this guideline represents one of several possible sets of vocabulary that may differ with respect to their purpose, data availability, and comprehensiveness. It was customized to correspond with established offshore wind practices and existing renewable energy industry terminology (e.g. DOE 2013, Brown et al. 2015) while conforming to established fossil resource classification as best as possible. The developers of the guideline recognize the fundamental differences that exist between fossil and renewable energy resources with respect to availability, accessibility, lifetime, and quality. Any quantitative comparison between fossil and renewable energy resources, including offshore wind, is therefore limited. For instance, O&G resources are finite and there may be significant uncertainty associated with the amount of the resource. In contrast, aboveground renewable resources, such as offshore wind, do not generally deplete over time but can vary significantly subhourly, daily, seasonally, and annually. The intent of this guideline is to make these differences transparent and develop an offshore wind resource classification that conforms to established fossil resource classifications where possible. This guideline also provides methods to quantitatively compare certain offshore wind energy resources to O&G resource classes for specific applications. Finally, this guideline identifies areas where analogies to established O&G terminology may be inappropriate or subject to misinterpretation.},
doi = {10.2172/1324535},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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  • This report summarizes the offshore wind resource potential for the contiguous United States and Hawaii as of May 2009. The development of this assessment has evolved over multiple stages as new regional meso-scale assessments became available, new validation data was obtained, and better modeling capabilities were implemented. It is expected that further updates to the current assessment will be made in future reports.
  • Deep C Wind, a consortium headed by the University of Maine will test the first U.S. offshore wind platforms in 2012. In advance of final siting and permitting of the test turbines off Monhegan Island, residents of the island off Maine require reassurance that the noise levels from the test turbines will not disturb them. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, at the request of the University of Maine, and with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy Wind Program, modeled the acoustic output of the planned test turbines.
  • On June 20, 1979, the President directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and publish within 120 days a voluntary guideline, applying specifically to solar energy and renewable resources, for the ratemaking and other regulatory policy standards established under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA). On October 12, 1979, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Notice of Proposed Voluntary Guideline and Public Hearings for Solar Energy and Renewable Resources Respecting the Federal Standards Under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) (44 FR 60236, October 18, 1979). This Notice summarizesmore » in the Preamble the public comments DOE received and presents the voluntary guideline in its final form as the Appendix hereto.« less
  • This document outlines the Department of Energy's strategy for accelerating the responsible development of offshore wind energy in the United States.
  • The basic sequence of functions and actions which will be or may be involved in the deployment of an offshore wind energy conversion system (WECS) installation is presented. Certain project configurations are posited in order to examine on a provisional basis the types of legal-institutional issues which might arise in the process of installation. These basic WECS configurations are: (1) fixed platform units within the three-mile limit; (2) artificial island or extended land fill within the three-mile limit; (3) fixed platform on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) beyond the three-mile limit; (4) artificial island on the OCS beyond the three-milemore » limit; (5) moored units on the OCS or out to the proposed 200-mile 'economic zone'; and (6) moored units beyond the outer limits of the OCS or beyond the proposed 'economic zone'.« less