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Title: Enabling the Billion-Ton Bioeconomy

Abstract

The United States is rich in non-food ‎biomass that can fuel the development of a thriving ‎bioeconomy where renewable and sustainable resources power cars and planes instead of petroleum. The ‎transportation and aviation industry is actively seeking ways to reduce its carbon footprint by powering planes with solid municipal waste, woody biomass, purpose-grown crops, and ‎algae. Watch this short video to learn how biomass is being used to make our country greener, provide new employment opportunities, and reduce our dependence on foreign oil.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
DOEEE (USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B)
OSTI Identifier:
1288652
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; BIOECONOMY; BIOMASS; FUELS; RENEWABLE AND SUSTSAINABLE RESOURCES

Citation Formats

Baumes, Harry, Csonka, Steve, Sayre, Richard, Steen, Eric, Kenney, Kevin, and Labbe, Nicole. Enabling the Billion-Ton Bioeconomy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Baumes, Harry, Csonka, Steve, Sayre, Richard, Steen, Eric, Kenney, Kevin, & Labbe, Nicole. Enabling the Billion-Ton Bioeconomy. United States.
Baumes, Harry, Csonka, Steve, Sayre, Richard, Steen, Eric, Kenney, Kevin, and Labbe, Nicole. 2016. "Enabling the Billion-Ton Bioeconomy". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1288652.
@article{osti_1288652,
title = {Enabling the Billion-Ton Bioeconomy},
author = {Baumes, Harry and Csonka, Steve and Sayre, Richard and Steen, Eric and Kenney, Kevin and Labbe, Nicole},
abstractNote = {The United States is rich in non-food ‎biomass that can fuel the development of a thriving ‎bioeconomy where renewable and sustainable resources power cars and planes instead of petroleum. The ‎transportation and aviation industry is actively seeking ways to reduce its carbon footprint by powering planes with solid municipal waste, woody biomass, purpose-grown crops, and ‎algae. Watch this short video to learn how biomass is being used to make our country greener, provide new employment opportunities, and reduce our dependence on foreign oil.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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