skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Running an open experiment: transparency and reproducibility in soil and ecosystem science

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1275967
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Research Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 8; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2016-07-30 03:19:22; Journal ID: ISSN 1748-9326
Publisher:
IOP Publishing
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Bond-Lamberty, Ben, Smith, A. Peyton, and Bailey, Vanessa. Running an open experiment: transparency and reproducibility in soil and ecosystem science. United Kingdom: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/11/8/084004.
Bond-Lamberty, Ben, Smith, A. Peyton, & Bailey, Vanessa. Running an open experiment: transparency and reproducibility in soil and ecosystem science. United Kingdom. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/11/8/084004.
Bond-Lamberty, Ben, Smith, A. Peyton, and Bailey, Vanessa. 2016. "Running an open experiment: transparency and reproducibility in soil and ecosystem science". United Kingdom. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/11/8/084004.
@article{osti_1275967,
title = {Running an open experiment: transparency and reproducibility in soil and ecosystem science},
author = {Bond-Lamberty, Ben and Smith, A. Peyton and Bailey, Vanessa},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1088/1748-9326/11/8/084004},
journal = {Environmental Research Letters},
number = 8,
volume = 11,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1088/1748-9326/11/8/084004

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share:
  • Researchers in soil and ecosystem science, and almost every other field, are being pushed--by funders, journals, governments, and their peers--to increase transparency and reproducibility of their work. A key part of this effort is a move towards open data as a way to fight post-publication data loss, improve data and code quality, enable powerful meta- and cross-disciplinary analyses, and increase trust in, and the efficiency of, publicly-funded research. Many scientists however lack experience in, and may be unsure of the benefits of, making their data and fully-reproducible analyses publicly available. Here we describe a recent "open experiment", in which wemore » documented every aspect of a soil incubation online, making all raw data, scripts, diagnostics, final analyses, and manuscripts available in real time. We found that using tools such as version control, issue tracking, and open-source statistical software improved data integrity, accelerated our team's communication and productivity, and ensured transparency. There are many avenues to improve scientific reproducibility and data availability, of which is this only one example, and it is not an approach suited for every experiment or situation. Nonetheless, we encourage the communities in our respective fields to consider its advantages, and to lead rather than follow with respect to scientific reproducibility, transparency, and data availability.« less
  • We investigated the effect of climate change on Poa secunda Presl. and soils in a shrub-steppe ecosystem in south-eastern Washington. Intact soil cores containing P. secunda were reciprocally transplanted between two elevations. Plants and soils were examined, respectively, 4.5 and 5 years later. The lower elevation (310 m) site is warmer (28.5°C air average monthly maximum) and drier (224 mm yr⁻¹) than the upper elevation (844 m) site (23.5°C air average monthly maximum, 272 mm yr⁻¹). Observations were also made on undisturbed plants at both sites. There was no effect of climate change on plant density, shoot biomass, or carbonmore » isotope discrimination in either transplanted plant population. The cooler, wetter environment significantly reduced percent cover and leaf length, while the warmer, drier environment had no effect. Warming and drying reduced percent shoot nitrogen, while the cooler, wetter environment had no effect. Culm density was zero for the lower elevation plants transplanted to the upper site and was 10.3 culms m⁻² at the lower site. There was no effect of warming and drying on the culm density of the upper elevation plants. Culm density of in situ lower elevation plants was greater than that of the in situ upper elevation plants. Warming and drying reduced total soil carbon 32% and total soil nitrogen 40%. The cooler, wetter environment had no effect on total soil C or N. Of the C and N that was lost over time, 64% of both came from the particulate organic matter fraction (POM, >53 mum). There was no effect of warming and drying on the upper population of P. secunda while exposing the lower population to the cooler, wetter environment reduced reproductive effort and percent cover. With the warmer and drier conditions that may develop with climate change, total C and N of semiarid soils may decrease with the active fraction of soil C also rapidly decreasing, which may alter ecosystem diversity and function.« less
  • There was no abstract included in this journal article.