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Title: ORNL’s ORiGAMI Uses Big Data to Help Solve Age-Old Medical Mysteries in Seconds

Abstract

ORiGAMI is a tool for discovering and evaluating potentially interesting associations and creating novel hypothesis in medicine. ORiGAMI will help you “connect the dots” across 70 million knowledge nuggets published in 23 million papers in the medical literature.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1258159
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; ORIGAMI; MEDICAL LITERATURE; JAPANESE ART; MYSTERY ILLNESSES

Citation Formats

Sukumar, Rangan. ORNL’s ORiGAMI Uses Big Data to Help Solve Age-Old Medical Mysteries in Seconds. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Sukumar, Rangan. ORNL’s ORiGAMI Uses Big Data to Help Solve Age-Old Medical Mysteries in Seconds. United States.
Sukumar, Rangan. 2016. "ORNL’s ORiGAMI Uses Big Data to Help Solve Age-Old Medical Mysteries in Seconds". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1258159.
@article{osti_1258159,
title = {ORNL’s ORiGAMI Uses Big Data to Help Solve Age-Old Medical Mysteries in Seconds},
author = {Sukumar, Rangan},
abstractNote = {ORiGAMI is a tool for discovering and evaluating potentially interesting associations and creating novel hypothesis in medicine. ORiGAMI will help you “connect the dots” across 70 million knowledge nuggets published in 23 million papers in the medical literature.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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