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Title: Pattern Effects of Soil on Photovoltaic Surfaces

Abstract

The texture or patterning of soil on PV surfaces may influence light capture at various angles of incidence (AOI). Accumulated soil can be considered a microshading element, which changes with respect to AOI. Laboratory deposition of simulated soil was used to prepare test coupons for simultaneous AOI and soiling loss experiments. A mixed solvent deposition technique was used to consistently deposit patterned test soils onto glass slides. Transmission decreased as soil loading and AOI increased. Dense aggregates significantly decreased transmission. But, highly dispersed particles are less prone to secondary scattering, improving overall light collection. In order to test AOI losses on relevant systems, uniform simulated soil coatings were applied to split reference cells to further examine this effect. Finally, the measured optical transmission and area coverage correlated closely to the observed $$I_{{rm SC}}$$. Angular losses were significant at angles as low as 25°.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  2. Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
OSTI Identifier:
1257794
Report Number(s):
SAND2016-4264J
Journal ID: ISSN 2156-3381; 639510
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
IEEE Journal of Photovoltaics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 2156-3381
Publisher:
IEEE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; soiling; surface contamination; performance loss; standardized test methods

Citation Formats

Burton, Patrick D., Hendrickson, Alex, Ulibarri, Stephen Seth, Riley, Daniel, Boyson, William E., and King, Bruce H.. Pattern Effects of Soil on Photovoltaic Surfaces. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1109/jphotov.2016.2567100.
Burton, Patrick D., Hendrickson, Alex, Ulibarri, Stephen Seth, Riley, Daniel, Boyson, William E., & King, Bruce H.. Pattern Effects of Soil on Photovoltaic Surfaces. United States. doi:10.1109/jphotov.2016.2567100.
Burton, Patrick D., Hendrickson, Alex, Ulibarri, Stephen Seth, Riley, Daniel, Boyson, William E., and King, Bruce H.. 2016. "Pattern Effects of Soil on Photovoltaic Surfaces". United States. doi:10.1109/jphotov.2016.2567100. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1257794.
@article{osti_1257794,
title = {Pattern Effects of Soil on Photovoltaic Surfaces},
author = {Burton, Patrick D. and Hendrickson, Alex and Ulibarri, Stephen Seth and Riley, Daniel and Boyson, William E. and King, Bruce H.},
abstractNote = {The texture or patterning of soil on PV surfaces may influence light capture at various angles of incidence (AOI). Accumulated soil can be considered a microshading element, which changes with respect to AOI. Laboratory deposition of simulated soil was used to prepare test coupons for simultaneous AOI and soiling loss experiments. A mixed solvent deposition technique was used to consistently deposit patterned test soils onto glass slides. Transmission decreased as soil loading and AOI increased. Dense aggregates significantly decreased transmission. But, highly dispersed particles are less prone to secondary scattering, improving overall light collection. In order to test AOI losses on relevant systems, uniform simulated soil coatings were applied to split reference cells to further examine this effect. Finally, the measured optical transmission and area coverage correlated closely to the observed $I_{{rm SC}}$. Angular losses were significant at angles as low as 25°.},
doi = {10.1109/jphotov.2016.2567100},
journal = {IEEE Journal of Photovoltaics},
number = 4,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

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