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Title: Systems Engineering Building Advances Power Grid Research

Abstract

Researchers and industry are now better equipped to tackle the nation’s most pressing energy challenges through PNNL’s new Systems Engineering Building – including challenges in grid modernization, buildings efficiency and renewable energy integration. This lab links real-time grid data, software platforms, specialized laboratories and advanced computing resources for the design and demonstration of new tools to modernize the grid and increase buildings energy efficiency.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
PNNL (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1255817
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; SYSTEMS ENGINEERING BUILDING; POWER GRID; GRID MODERNIZATION; GRID OPERATORS; ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEM

Citation Formats

Virden, Jud, Huang, Henry, Skare, Paul, Dagle, Jeff, Imhoff, Carl, Stoustrup, Jakob, Melton, Ron, Stiles, Dennis, and Pratt, Rob. Systems Engineering Building Advances Power Grid Research. United States: N. p., 2015. Web.
Virden, Jud, Huang, Henry, Skare, Paul, Dagle, Jeff, Imhoff, Carl, Stoustrup, Jakob, Melton, Ron, Stiles, Dennis, & Pratt, Rob. Systems Engineering Building Advances Power Grid Research. United States.
Virden, Jud, Huang, Henry, Skare, Paul, Dagle, Jeff, Imhoff, Carl, Stoustrup, Jakob, Melton, Ron, Stiles, Dennis, and Pratt, Rob. Wed . "Systems Engineering Building Advances Power Grid Research". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1255817.
@article{osti_1255817,
title = {Systems Engineering Building Advances Power Grid Research},
author = {Virden, Jud and Huang, Henry and Skare, Paul and Dagle, Jeff and Imhoff, Carl and Stoustrup, Jakob and Melton, Ron and Stiles, Dennis and Pratt, Rob},
abstractNote = {Researchers and industry are now better equipped to tackle the nation’s most pressing energy challenges through PNNL’s new Systems Engineering Building – including challenges in grid modernization, buildings efficiency and renewable energy integration. This lab links real-time grid data, software platforms, specialized laboratories and advanced computing resources for the design and demonstration of new tools to modernize the grid and increase buildings energy efficiency.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Aug 19 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Wed Aug 19 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
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