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Title: International code of nomenclature of prokaryotes

Abstract

Here, this volume contains the edition of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes that was presented in draft form and available for comment at the Plenary Session of the Fourteenth International Congress of Bacteriology and Applied Microbiology (BAM), Montréal, 2014, together with updated lists of conserved and rejected bacterial names and of Opinions issued by the Judicial Commission. As in the past it brings together those changes accepted, published and documented by the ICSP and the Judicial Commission since the last revision was published. Several new appendices have been added to this edition. Appendix 11 addresses the appropriate application of the Candidatus concept, Appendix 12 contains the history of the van Niel Prize, and Appendix 13 contains the summaries of Congresses.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)
  2. NamesforLife, LLC, East Lansing, MI (United States)
  3. Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen (DSMZ), Braunschweig (Germany)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
NamesforLife, LLC, East Lansing, MI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1254416
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0006191
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 1466-5026
Publisher:
International Union of Microbiological Societies
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; biological nomenclature; rules; standards; terminology

Citation Formats

Garrity, George M., Parker, Charles T., and Tindall, Brian J. International code of nomenclature of prokaryotes. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1099/ijsem.0.000778.
Garrity, George M., Parker, Charles T., & Tindall, Brian J. International code of nomenclature of prokaryotes. United States. doi:10.1099/ijsem.0.000778.
Garrity, George M., Parker, Charles T., and Tindall, Brian J. Fri . "International code of nomenclature of prokaryotes". United States. doi:10.1099/ijsem.0.000778. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1254416.
@article{osti_1254416,
title = {International code of nomenclature of prokaryotes},
author = {Garrity, George M. and Parker, Charles T. and Tindall, Brian J.},
abstractNote = {Here, this volume contains the edition of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes that was presented in draft form and available for comment at the Plenary Session of the Fourteenth International Congress of Bacteriology and Applied Microbiology (BAM), Montréal, 2014, together with updated lists of conserved and rejected bacterial names and of Opinions issued by the Judicial Commission. As in the past it brings together those changes accepted, published and documented by the ICSP and the Judicial Commission since the last revision was published. Several new appendices have been added to this edition. Appendix 11 addresses the appropriate application of the Candidatus concept, Appendix 12 contains the history of the van Niel Prize, and Appendix 13 contains the summaries of Congresses.},
doi = {10.1099/ijsem.0.000778},
journal = {International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology},
number = 6,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Nov 20 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Fri Nov 20 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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