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Title: Clouds at CTIO and the Dark Energy Survey

Abstract

An understanding of the weather patters at Cerro-Tololo Inter-American (CTIO) Observatory, the observing site for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), is important for assessing the efciency of DES operations in using observing time and for planning future operations. CTIO has maintained records of cloud-cover by quarters of nights since 1975. A comparison between these cloud records in the 2013-2014 DES observing season (DES year 1) and achieved observing efciency and exposure quality allows the DES collaboration to make better use of the historical records in survey planning. Plots and tables here relate human recorded cloud-cover to collection of good DES data, show the variation of typical cloud-cover by month, and evaluate the relationship between the El Niño weather pattern and cloud-cover at CTIO.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1250881
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-FN-1002-AE-CD
1424764
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Neilsen, Jr., Eric. Clouds at CTIO and the Dark Energy Survey. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.2172/1250881.
Neilsen, Jr., Eric. Clouds at CTIO and the Dark Energy Survey. United States. doi:10.2172/1250881.
Neilsen, Jr., Eric. Sat . "Clouds at CTIO and the Dark Energy Survey". United States. doi:10.2172/1250881. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1250881.
@article{osti_1250881,
title = {Clouds at CTIO and the Dark Energy Survey},
author = {Neilsen, Jr., Eric},
abstractNote = {An understanding of the weather patters at Cerro-Tololo Inter-American (CTIO) Observatory, the observing site for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), is important for assessing the efciency of DES operations in using observing time and for planning future operations. CTIO has maintained records of cloud-cover by quarters of nights since 1975. A comparison between these cloud records in the 2013-2014 DES observing season (DES year 1) and achieved observing efciency and exposure quality allows the DES collaboration to make better use of the historical records in survey planning. Plots and tables here relate human recorded cloud-cover to collection of good DES data, show the variation of typical cloud-cover by month, and evaluate the relationship between the El Niño weather pattern and cloud-cover at CTIO.},
doi = {10.2172/1250881},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Sat Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}

Technical Report:

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