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Title: Chiral magnetic effect in condensed matter systems

Abstract

The chiral magnetic effect is the generation of electrical current induced by chirality imbalance in the presence of magnetic field. It is a macroscopic manifestation of the quantum anomaly in relativistic field theory of chiral fermions. In the quark-gluon plasma, the axial anomaly induces topological charge changing transition that results in the generation of electrical current along the magnetic field. In condensed matter systems, the chiral magnetic effect was first predicted in the gapless semiconductors with tow energy bands having pointlike degeneracies. In addition, thirty years later after this prediction, the chiral magnetic effect was finally observed in the 3D Dirac/Weyl semimetals.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  2. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1245403
Report Number(s):
BNL-112016-2016-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 0375-9474; R&D Project: MA012MABA; KC0202050
Grant/Contract Number:
SC00112704
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nuclear Physics. A
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 956; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0375-9474
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY

Citation Formats

Li, Qiang, and Kharzeev, Dmitri E. Chiral magnetic effect in condensed matter systems. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.nuclphysa.2016.03.055.
Li, Qiang, & Kharzeev, Dmitri E. Chiral magnetic effect in condensed matter systems. United States. doi:10.1016/j.nuclphysa.2016.03.055.
Li, Qiang, and Kharzeev, Dmitri E. 2016. "Chiral magnetic effect in condensed matter systems". United States. doi:10.1016/j.nuclphysa.2016.03.055. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1245403.
@article{osti_1245403,
title = {Chiral magnetic effect in condensed matter systems},
author = {Li, Qiang and Kharzeev, Dmitri E.},
abstractNote = {The chiral magnetic effect is the generation of electrical current induced by chirality imbalance in the presence of magnetic field. It is a macroscopic manifestation of the quantum anomaly in relativistic field theory of chiral fermions. In the quark-gluon plasma, the axial anomaly induces topological charge changing transition that results in the generation of electrical current along the magnetic field. In condensed matter systems, the chiral magnetic effect was first predicted in the gapless semiconductors with tow energy bands having pointlike degeneracies. In addition, thirty years later after this prediction, the chiral magnetic effect was finally observed in the 3D Dirac/Weyl semimetals.},
doi = {10.1016/j.nuclphysa.2016.03.055},
journal = {Nuclear Physics. A},
number = C,
volume = 956,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month =
}

Journal Article:
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