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Title: LES ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation (LASSO) Implementation Strategy

Abstract

This document illustrates the design of the Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation (LASSO) workflow to provide a routine, high-resolution modeling capability to augment the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s high-density observations. LASSO will create a powerful new capability for furthering ARM’s mission to advance understanding of cloud, radiation, aerosol, and land-surface processes. The combined observational and modeling elements will enable a new level of scientific inquiry by connecting processes and context to observations and providing needed statistics for details that cannot be measured. The result will be improved process understanding that facilitates concomitant improvements in climate model parameterizations. The initial LASSO implementation will be for ARM’s Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma and will focus on shallow convection, which is poorly simulated by climate models due in part to clouds’ typically small spatial scale compared to model grid spacing, and because the convection involves complicated interactions of microphysical and boundary layer processes.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
  2. Brookhaven National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
DOE Office of Science Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1232664
Report Number(s):
DOE/SC-ARM-15-039
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-7601830
Resource Type:
Program Document
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Gustafson Jr., WI, and Vogelmann, AM. LES ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation (LASSO) Implementation Strategy. United States: N. p., 2015. Web.
Gustafson Jr., WI, & Vogelmann, AM. LES ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation (LASSO) Implementation Strategy. United States.
Gustafson Jr., WI, and Vogelmann, AM. Tue . "LES ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation (LASSO) Implementation Strategy". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1232664.
@article{osti_1232664,
title = {LES ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation (LASSO) Implementation Strategy},
author = {Gustafson Jr., WI and Vogelmann, AM},
abstractNote = {This document illustrates the design of the Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation (LASSO) workflow to provide a routine, high-resolution modeling capability to augment the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s high-density observations. LASSO will create a powerful new capability for furthering ARM’s mission to advance understanding of cloud, radiation, aerosol, and land-surface processes. The combined observational and modeling elements will enable a new level of scientific inquiry by connecting processes and context to observations and providing needed statistics for details that cannot be measured. The result will be improved process understanding that facilitates concomitant improvements in climate model parameterizations. The initial LASSO implementation will be for ARM’s Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma and will focus on shallow convection, which is poorly simulated by climate models due in part to clouds’ typically small spatial scale compared to model grid spacing, and because the convection involves complicated interactions of microphysical and boundary layer processes.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Tue Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}

Program Document:
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