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Title: EAGLE: 'EAGLE'Is an' Algorithmic Graph Library for Exploration

Abstract

The Resource Description Framework (RDF) and SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language (SPARQL) were introduced about a decade ago to enable flexible schema-free data interchange on the Semantic Web. Today data scientists use the framework as a scalable graph representation for integrating, querying, exploring and analyzing data sets hosted at different sources. With increasing adoption, the need for graph mining capabilities for the Semantic Web has emerged. Today there is no tools to conduct "graph mining" on RDF standard data sets. We address that need through implementation of popular iterative Graph Mining algorithms (Triangle count, Connected component analysis, degree distribution, diversity degree, PageRank, etc.). We implement these algorithms as SPARQL queries, wrapped within Python scripts and call our software tool as EAGLE. In RDF style, EAGLE stands for "EAGLE 'Is an' algorithmic graph library for exploration. EAGLE is like 'MATLAB' for 'Linked Data.'

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1232204
Report Number(s):
EAGLE; 003500WKSTN00
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Software
Software Revision:
00
Software Package Number:
003500
Software Package Contents:
Open Source Software package available from Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the following URL: https://github.com/ssrangan
Software CPU:
WKSTN
Open Source:
Yes
Source Code Available:
Yes
Country of Publication:
United States

Citation Formats

. EAGLE: 'EAGLE'Is an' Algorithmic Graph Library for Exploration. Computer software. https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1232204. Vers. 00. USDOE. 16 Jan. 2015. Web.
. (2015, January 16). EAGLE: 'EAGLE'Is an' Algorithmic Graph Library for Exploration (Version 00) [Computer software]. https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1232204.
. EAGLE: 'EAGLE'Is an' Algorithmic Graph Library for Exploration. Computer software. Version 00. January 16, 2015. https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1232204.
@misc{osti_1232204,
title = {EAGLE: 'EAGLE'Is an' Algorithmic Graph Library for Exploration, Version 00},
author = {},
abstractNote = {The Resource Description Framework (RDF) and SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language (SPARQL) were introduced about a decade ago to enable flexible schema-free data interchange on the Semantic Web. Today data scientists use the framework as a scalable graph representation for integrating, querying, exploring and analyzing data sets hosted at different sources. With increasing adoption, the need for graph mining capabilities for the Semantic Web has emerged. Today there is no tools to conduct "graph mining" on RDF standard data sets. We address that need through implementation of popular iterative Graph Mining algorithms (Triangle count, Connected component analysis, degree distribution, diversity degree, PageRank, etc.). We implement these algorithms as SPARQL queries, wrapped within Python scripts and call our software tool as EAGLE. In RDF style, EAGLE stands for "EAGLE 'Is an' algorithmic graph library for exploration. EAGLE is like 'MATLAB' for 'Linked Data.'},
url = {https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1232204},
doi = {},
year = 2015,
month = 1,
note =
}

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