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Title: CCM3 to MM5 Data Conversion

Abstract

The accompanying script (which uses the NCAR Command Language) ready output from the Community Climate Model Code, version 3 (CCM3) and converts it to input format for the Mesoscale Model, version 5 (MM5) code. The script utilizes a Fortran binary write routine.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1230961
Report Number(s):
CCM3_TO_MM5; 002049WKSTN00
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-Eng-48
Resource Type:
Software
Software Revision:
00
Software Package Number:
002049
Software Package Contents:
Media Directory; Software Abstract and ReadMe File;/1 CD ROM
Software CPU:
WKSTN
Open Source:
No
Source Code Available:
No
Country of Publication:
United States

Citation Formats

Taylor, John, and Mirin, Arthur. CCM3 to MM5 Data Conversion. Computer software. Vers. 00. USDOE. 2 Mar. 2007. Web.
Taylor, John, & Mirin, Arthur. (2007, March 2). CCM3 to MM5 Data Conversion (Version 00) [Computer software].
Taylor, John, and Mirin, Arthur. CCM3 to MM5 Data Conversion. Computer software. Version 00. March 2, 2007.
@misc{osti_1230961,
title = {CCM3 to MM5 Data Conversion, Version 00},
author = {Taylor, John and Mirin, Arthur},
abstractNote = {The accompanying script (which uses the NCAR Command Language) ready output from the Community Climate Model Code, version 3 (CCM3) and converts it to input format for the Mesoscale Model, version 5 (MM5) code. The script utilizes a Fortran binary write routine.},
doi = {},
year = {Fri Mar 02 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Mar 02 00:00:00 EST 2007},
note =
}

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