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Title: Atomic and molecular adsorption on Au(111)

Abstract

Periodic self-consistent density functional theory (DFT-GGA) calculations were used to study the adsorption of several atomic species, molecular species and molecular fragments on the Au(111) surface with a coverage of 1/4 monolayer (ML). Binding geometries, binding energies, and diffusion barriers were calculated for 27 species. Furthermore, we calculated the surface deformation energy associated with the binding events. The binding strength for all the analyzed species can be ordered as follows: NH 3 < NO < CO < CH 3 < HCO < NH 2 < COOH < OH < HCOO < CNH 2 < H < N < NH < NOH < COH < Cl,< HCO 3 < CH 2 < CN b HNO < O < F < S < C < CH. Although the atomic species preferred to bind at the three-fold fcc site, no tendency was observed in site preference for the molecular species and fragments. The intramolecular and adsorbate-surface vibrational frequencies were calculated for all the adsorbates on their most energetically stable adsorption site. Most of the theoretical binding energies and frequencies agreed with experimental values reported in the literature. In general, the values obtained with the PW91 functional are more accurate than RPBE in reproducingmore » these experimental binding energies. The energies of the adsorbed species were used to calculate the thermochemical potential energy surfaces for decomposition of CO, NO, N 2, NH 3 and CH 4, oxidation of CO, and hydrogenation of CO, CO 2 and NO, giving insight into the thermochemistry of these reactions on gold nanoparticles. These potential energy surfaces demonstrated that: the decomposition of species is not energetically favorable on Au(111); the desorption of NH 3, NO and CO are more favorable than their decomposition; the oxidation of CO and hydrogenation of CO and NO on Au(111) to form HCO and HNO, respectively, are also thermodynamically favorable.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [2]
  1. Univ. of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez (Puerto Rico)
  2. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1227065
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Surface Science; Journal Volume: 627; Journal Issue: C
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Santiago-Rodríguez, Yohaselly, Herron, Jeffrey A., Curet-Arana, María C., and Mavrikakis, Manos. Atomic and molecular adsorption on Au(111). United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1016/j.susc.2014.04.012.
Santiago-Rodríguez, Yohaselly, Herron, Jeffrey A., Curet-Arana, María C., & Mavrikakis, Manos. Atomic and molecular adsorption on Au(111). United States. doi:10.1016/j.susc.2014.04.012.
Santiago-Rodríguez, Yohaselly, Herron, Jeffrey A., Curet-Arana, María C., and Mavrikakis, Manos. 2014. "Atomic and molecular adsorption on Au(111)". United States. doi:10.1016/j.susc.2014.04.012.
@article{osti_1227065,
title = {Atomic and molecular adsorption on Au(111)},
author = {Santiago-Rodríguez, Yohaselly and Herron, Jeffrey A. and Curet-Arana, María C. and Mavrikakis, Manos},
abstractNote = {Periodic self-consistent density functional theory (DFT-GGA) calculations were used to study the adsorption of several atomic species, molecular species and molecular fragments on the Au(111) surface with a coverage of 1/4 monolayer (ML). Binding geometries, binding energies, and diffusion barriers were calculated for 27 species. Furthermore, we calculated the surface deformation energy associated with the binding events. The binding strength for all the analyzed species can be ordered as follows: NH3 < NO < CO < CH3 < HCO < NH2 < COOH < OH < HCOO < CNH2 < H < N < NH < NOH < COH < Cl,< HCO3 < CH2 < CN b HNO < O < F < S < C < CH. Although the atomic species preferred to bind at the three-fold fcc site, no tendency was observed in site preference for the molecular species and fragments. The intramolecular and adsorbate-surface vibrational frequencies were calculated for all the adsorbates on their most energetically stable adsorption site. Most of the theoretical binding energies and frequencies agreed with experimental values reported in the literature. In general, the values obtained with the PW91 functional are more accurate than RPBE in reproducing these experimental binding energies. The energies of the adsorbed species were used to calculate the thermochemical potential energy surfaces for decomposition of CO, NO, N2, NH3 and CH4, oxidation of CO, and hydrogenation of CO, CO2 and NO, giving insight into the thermochemistry of these reactions on gold nanoparticles. These potential energy surfaces demonstrated that: the decomposition of species is not energetically favorable on Au(111); the desorption of NH3, NO and CO are more favorable than their decomposition; the oxidation of CO and hydrogenation of CO and NO on Au(111) to form HCO and HNO, respectively, are also thermodynamically favorable.},
doi = {10.1016/j.susc.2014.04.012},
journal = {Surface Science},
number = C,
volume = 627,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month = 9
}
  • Using periodic, self-consistent density functional theory calculations, the adsorption of several atomic (H, S, N, O and C) and molecular (CO2, N2, NH3, HCN, CO and NO) species and molecular fragments (NH2, NH, CN, CNH2, HNO, NOH, CH3, CH2, CH and OH) on the (0001) facet of rhenium at a coverage of 0.25 ML has been studied. Preferred binding sites with their corresponding binding energy and deformation energy of the surface, as well as an estimated diffusion barrier of each species have been determined. Atomic species and molecular fragments tend to bind to threefold sites, whereas molecular species tend tomore » bind to top sites. The binding strength, with respect to the corresponding gas phase species and in increasing order for all species studied, is: CO2 < N2 < NH3 < CO < CH3 < HCN < NO < H < NH2 < OH < CH2 < CNH2 < CN < HNO < NH < NOH < S < N < O < CH < C. The vibrational frequencies of all species in their most energetically favorable adsorbed configuration have been calculated. Finally, the thermochemistry of adsorption and decomposition of NO, NO + H, NH3, N2, CO2, CO and CH4 on Re(0001) has been analyzed.« less
  • The adsorption properties of a variety of atoms (H, O, N, S, and C), molecules (N2, HCN, CO, NO, and NH3) and molecular fragments (CN, NH2, NH, CH3, CH2, CH, HNO, NOH, and OH) are calculated on the (0001) facet of ruthenium using periodic, self-consistent, density functional theory calculations (DFT-GGA) at 1/4 ML coverage. For each species, we determine the optimal binding geometry and corresponding binding energy. The vibrational frequencies of these adsorbed species are calculated and are found to be in good agreement with experimental values that have been reported in the literature. From the binding energies, we calculatemore » potential energy surfaces for the decomposition of NO, CO, N2, NH3, and CH4 on Ru(0001), showing that the decomposition of all of these molecules is thermochemically preferred to their desorption.« less
  • The adsorption properties of a variety of atomic species (H, O, N, S, and C), molecular species (N2, HCN, CO, NO, and NH3) and molecular fragments (CN,NH2, NH, CH3, CH2, CH, HNO, NOH, and OH) are calculated on the (111) facet of palladium using periodic self-consistent density functional theory (DFT–GGA) calculations at ¼ ML coverage. For each species, we determine the optimal binding geometry and corresponding binding energy. The vibrational frequencies of these adsorbed species are calculated and are found to be in good agreement with experimental values that have been reported in literature. From the binding energies, we calculatemore » potential energy surfaces for the decomposition of NO, CO, N2, NH3, and CH4 on Pd(111), showing that only the decomposition of NO is thermochemically preferred to its molecular desorption.« less
  • Iron is the principal catalyst for the ammonia synthesis process and the Fischer–Tropsch process, as well as many other heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. It is thus of fundamental importance to understand the interactions between the iron surface and various reaction intermediates. Here in this paper, we present a systematic study of atomic and molecular adsorption behavior over Fe(110) using periodic, self-consistent density functional theory (DFT-GGA) calculations. The preferred binding sites, binding energies, and the corresponding surface deformation energies of five atomic species (H, C, N, O, and S), six molecular species (NH 3, CH 4, N 2, CO, HCN, and NO),more » and eleven molecular fragments (CH, CH 2, CH 3, NH, NH 2, OH, CN, COH, HCO, NOH, and HNO) were determined on the Fe(110) surface at a coverage of 0.25 monolayer. The binding strengths calculated using the PW91 functional decreased in the following order: C> CH > N > O > S > NH > COH > CN > CH2 > NOH > OH > HNO > HCO > NH2 > H > NO > HCN > CH 3 > CO > N 2 > NH 3. No stable binding structures were observed for CH 4. The estimated diffusion barriers and pathways, as well as the adsorbate-surface and intramolecular vibrational modes of all the adsorbates at their preferred binding sites, were identified. Using the calculated adsorption energetics, we constructed the potential energy surfaces for a few surface reactions including the decomposition of methane, ammonia, dinitrogen, carbon monoxide, and nitric oxide. These potential energy surfaces provide valuable insight into the ability of Fe(110) to catalyze common elementary steps.« less
  • Periodic self-consistent density functional theory (DFT-GGA) calculations were used to study the adsorption of several atomic species, molecular species and molecular fragments on the Au(111) surface with a coverage of 1/4 monolayer (ML). Binding geometries, binding energies, and diffusion barriers were calculated for 27 species. Furthermore, we calculated the surface deformation energy associated with the binding events. The binding strength for all the analyzed species can be ordered as follows: NH 3 < NO < CO < CH 3 < HCO < NH 2 < COOH < OH < HCOO < CNH 2 < H < N < NH <more » NOH < COH < Cl < HCO 3 < CH 2 < CN < HNO < O < F < S < C < CH. Although the atomic species preferred to bind at the three-fold fcc site, no tendency was observed in site preference for the molecular species and fragments. The intramolecular and adsorbate-surface vibrational frequencies were calculated for all the adsorbates on their most energetically stable adsorption site. Most of the theoretical binding energies and frequencies agreed with experimental values reported in the literature. In general, the values obtained with the PW91 functional are more accurate than RPBE in reproducing these experimental binding energies. The energies of the adsorbed species were used to calculate the thermochemical potential energy surfaces for decomposition of CO, NO, N 2, NH 3 and CH 4, oxidation of CO, and hydrogenation of CO, CO 2 and NO, giving insight into the thermochemistry of these reactions on gold nanoparticles. As a result, these potential energy surfaces demonstrated that: the decomposition of species is not energetically favorable on Au(111); the desorption of NH 3, NO and CO are more favorable than their decomposition; the oxidation of CO and hydrogenation of CO and NO on Au(111) to form HCO and HNO, respectively, are also thermodynamically favorable.« less