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Title: Benefits Analysis for DOE Energy Technology Portfolio Assessment: Background

Abstract

A presentation for the FY 2007 GPRA methodology review on benefits analysis for the DOE energy technology portfolio assessment.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
EERE Publication and Product Library
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1216509
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
GPRA; methodology review; benefits analysis; portfolio assessment; DOE; energy technology

Citation Formats

Beschen, Darrell. Benefits Analysis for DOE Energy Technology Portfolio Assessment: Background. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/1216509.
Beschen, Darrell. Benefits Analysis for DOE Energy Technology Portfolio Assessment: Background. United States. doi:10.2172/1216509.
Beschen, Darrell. Wed . "Benefits Analysis for DOE Energy Technology Portfolio Assessment: Background". United States. doi:10.2172/1216509. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1216509.
@article{osti_1216509,
title = {Benefits Analysis for DOE Energy Technology Portfolio Assessment: Background},
author = {Beschen, Darrell},
abstractNote = {A presentation for the FY 2007 GPRA methodology review on benefits analysis for the DOE energy technology portfolio assessment.},
doi = {10.2172/1216509},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Dec 20 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Dec 20 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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