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Title: Cord Wood Testing in a Non-Catalytic Wood Stove

Abstract

EPA Method 28 and the current wood stove regulations have been in-place since 1988. Recently, EPA proposed an update to the existing NSPS for wood stove regulations which includes a plan to transition from the current crib wood fuel to cord wood fuel for certification testing. Cord wood is seen as generally more representative of field conditions while the crib wood is seen as more repeatable. In any change of certification test fuel, there are questions about the impact on measured results and the correlation between tests with the two different fuels. The purpose of the work reported here is to provide data on the performance of a noncatalytic stove with cord wood. The stove selected has previously been certified with crib wood which provides a basis for comparison with cord wood. Overall, particulate emissions were found to be considerably higher with cord wood.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Environmental Protection Agency; USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1193192
Report Number(s):
BNL-106158-2014-IR
DOE Contract Number:
DE-SC00112704
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION

Citation Formats

Butcher, T., Trojanowski, R., and Wei, G. Cord Wood Testing in a Non-Catalytic Wood Stove. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.2172/1193192.
Butcher, T., Trojanowski, R., & Wei, G. Cord Wood Testing in a Non-Catalytic Wood Stove. United States. doi:10.2172/1193192.
Butcher, T., Trojanowski, R., and Wei, G. 2014. "Cord Wood Testing in a Non-Catalytic Wood Stove". United States. doi:10.2172/1193192. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1193192.
@article{osti_1193192,
title = {Cord Wood Testing in a Non-Catalytic Wood Stove},
author = {Butcher, T. and Trojanowski, R. and Wei, G.},
abstractNote = {EPA Method 28 and the current wood stove regulations have been in-place since 1988. Recently, EPA proposed an update to the existing NSPS for wood stove regulations which includes a plan to transition from the current crib wood fuel to cord wood fuel for certification testing. Cord wood is seen as generally more representative of field conditions while the crib wood is seen as more repeatable. In any change of certification test fuel, there are questions about the impact on measured results and the correlation between tests with the two different fuels. The purpose of the work reported here is to provide data on the performance of a noncatalytic stove with cord wood. The stove selected has previously been certified with crib wood which provides a basis for comparison with cord wood. Overall, particulate emissions were found to be considerably higher with cord wood.},
doi = {10.2172/1193192},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:

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