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Title: Achieving High-Density States through Shock-Wave Loading of Pre-Compressed Samples

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1169838
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JRNL-230703
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 104, no. 22, May 29, 2007, pp. 9172-9177
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION

Citation Formats

Jeanloz, R, Celliers, P M, Collins, G W, Eggert, J H, Lee, K K, McWilliams, R S, Brygoo, S, and Loubeyre, P. Achieving High-Density States through Shock-Wave Loading of Pre-Compressed Samples. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Jeanloz, R, Celliers, P M, Collins, G W, Eggert, J H, Lee, K K, McWilliams, R S, Brygoo, S, & Loubeyre, P. Achieving High-Density States through Shock-Wave Loading of Pre-Compressed Samples. United States.
Jeanloz, R, Celliers, P M, Collins, G W, Eggert, J H, Lee, K K, McWilliams, R S, Brygoo, S, and Loubeyre, P. Wed . "Achieving High-Density States through Shock-Wave Loading of Pre-Compressed Samples". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1169838.
@article{osti_1169838,
title = {Achieving High-Density States through Shock-Wave Loading of Pre-Compressed Samples},
author = {Jeanloz, R and Celliers, P M and Collins, G W and Eggert, J H and Lee, K K and McWilliams, R S and Brygoo, S and Loubeyre, P},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 104, no. 22, May 29, 2007, pp. 9172-9177},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed May 02 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Wed May 02 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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