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Title: ENGINEERED INTERFACE CHEMISTRY TO IMPROVE THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES CURED BY ELECTRON BEAM

Abstract

A reactive sizing was designed to achieve high levels of interfacial adhesion and mechanical properties with a carbon fiber-acrylate system cured by electron beam (EB). The sizing was made of a partially cured epoxy sizing with a high density of pendant functional groups (acrylate functionality) able to generate a covalent bonding with the matrix. The interlaminar shear strength was clearly improved from 61 MPa to 81 MPa (+ 33 %) without any post-processing, reaching a similar value to the one obtained with the same system cured by a thermal treatment. Observation of the fracture profiles clearly highlighted a change in the fracture mechanism from a purely adhesive failure to a cohesive failure. Such improvements of the mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites cured by EB, without any post-cure, have not been reported previously to the best of our knowledge. This constitutes a breakthrough for the industrial development of composites EB curing.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. ORNL
  2. Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Work for Others (WFO)
OSTI Identifier:
1154833
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research; Journal Volume: 53; Journal Issue: 32
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Vautard, Frederic, Grappe, Hippolyte A., and Ozcan, Soydan. ENGINEERED INTERFACE CHEMISTRY TO IMPROVE THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES CURED BY ELECTRON BEAM. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1021/ie501678j.
Vautard, Frederic, Grappe, Hippolyte A., & Ozcan, Soydan. ENGINEERED INTERFACE CHEMISTRY TO IMPROVE THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES CURED BY ELECTRON BEAM. United States. doi:10.1021/ie501678j.
Vautard, Frederic, Grappe, Hippolyte A., and Ozcan, Soydan. 2014. "ENGINEERED INTERFACE CHEMISTRY TO IMPROVE THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES CURED BY ELECTRON BEAM". United States. doi:10.1021/ie501678j.
@article{osti_1154833,
title = {ENGINEERED INTERFACE CHEMISTRY TO IMPROVE THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES CURED BY ELECTRON BEAM},
author = {Vautard, Frederic and Grappe, Hippolyte A. and Ozcan, Soydan},
abstractNote = {A reactive sizing was designed to achieve high levels of interfacial adhesion and mechanical properties with a carbon fiber-acrylate system cured by electron beam (EB). The sizing was made of a partially cured epoxy sizing with a high density of pendant functional groups (acrylate functionality) able to generate a covalent bonding with the matrix. The interlaminar shear strength was clearly improved from 61 MPa to 81 MPa (+ 33 %) without any post-processing, reaching a similar value to the one obtained with the same system cured by a thermal treatment. Observation of the fracture profiles clearly highlighted a change in the fracture mechanism from a purely adhesive failure to a cohesive failure. Such improvements of the mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites cured by EB, without any post-cure, have not been reported previously to the best of our knowledge. This constitutes a breakthrough for the industrial development of composites EB curing.},
doi = {10.1021/ie501678j},
journal = {Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research},
number = 32,
volume = 53,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month = 1
}
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