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Title: Community dynamics of cellulose-adapted thermophilic bacterial consortia

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Joint Bioenergy Institute (JBEI)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER)
OSTI Identifier:
1153378
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Microbiology; Journal Volume: 15; Journal Issue: 9
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Stephanie A.,Eichorst, Patanjali,Varanasi, Vatalie,Stavila, Marcin,Zemla, Manfred,Auer, Seema,Singh, Blake A.,Simmons, and Steven W.,Singer. Community dynamics of cellulose-adapted thermophilic bacterial consortia. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1111/1462-2920.12159.
Stephanie A.,Eichorst, Patanjali,Varanasi, Vatalie,Stavila, Marcin,Zemla, Manfred,Auer, Seema,Singh, Blake A.,Simmons, & Steven W.,Singer. Community dynamics of cellulose-adapted thermophilic bacterial consortia. United States. doi:10.1111/1462-2920.12159.
Stephanie A.,Eichorst, Patanjali,Varanasi, Vatalie,Stavila, Marcin,Zemla, Manfred,Auer, Seema,Singh, Blake A.,Simmons, and Steven W.,Singer. Sun . "Community dynamics of cellulose-adapted thermophilic bacterial consortia". United States. doi:10.1111/1462-2920.12159.
@article{osti_1153378,
title = {Community dynamics of cellulose-adapted thermophilic bacterial consortia},
author = {Stephanie A.,Eichorst and Patanjali,Varanasi and Vatalie,Stavila and Marcin,Zemla and Manfred,Auer and Seema,Singh and Blake A.,Simmons and Steven W.,Singer},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/1462-2920.12159},
journal = {Environmental Microbiology},
number = 9,
volume = 15,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2013},
month = {Sun Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2013}
}
  • Industrial-scale biofuel production requires robust enzymatic cocktails to produce fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass. Thermophilic bacterial consortia are a potential source of cellulases and hemicellulases adapted to harsher reaction conditions than commercial fungal enzymes. Compost-derived microbial consortia were adapted to switchgrass at 60 C to develop thermophilic biomass-degrading consortia for detailed studies. Microbial community analysis using small-subunit rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing and short-read metagenomic sequencing demonstrated that thermophilic adaptation to switchgrass resulted in low-diversity bacterial consortia with a high abundance of bacteria related to thermophilic paenibacilli, Rhodothermus marinus, and Thermus thermophilus. At lower abundance, thermophilic Chloroflexi and an uncultivated lineagemore » of the Gemmatimonadetes phylum were observed. Supernatants isolated from these consortia had high levels of xylanase and endoglucanase activities. Compared to commercial enzyme preparations, the endoglucanase enzymes had a higher thermotolerance and were more stable in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim][OAc]), an ionic liquid used for biomass pretreatment. The supernatants were used to saccharify [C2mim][OAc]-pretreated switchgrass at elevated temperatures (up to 80 C), demonstrating that these consortia are an excellent source of enzymes for the development of enzymatic cocktails tailored to more extreme reaction conditions.« less
  • Thermophilic bacteria are a potential source of enzymes for the deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass. However, the complement of proteins used to deconstruct biomass and the specific roles of different microbial groups in thermophilic biomass deconstruction are not well-explored. Here we report on the metagenomic and proteogenomic analyses of a compost-derived bacterial consortium adapted to switchgrass at elevated temperature with high levels of glycoside hydrolase activities. Near-complete genomes were reconstructed for the most abundant populations, which included composite genomes for populations closely related to sequenced strains of Thermus thermophilus and Rhodothermus marinus, and for novel populations that are related to thermophilicmore » Paenibacilli and an uncultivated subdivision of the littlestudied Gemmatimonadetes phylum. Partial genomes were also reconstructed for a number of lower abundance thermophilic Chloroflexi populations. Identification of genes for lignocellulose processing and metabolic reconstructions suggested Rhodothermus, Paenibacillus and Gemmatimonadetes as key groups for deconstructing biomass, and Thermus as a group that may primarily metabolize low molecular weight compounds. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of the consortium was used to identify .3000 proteins in fractionated samples from the cultures, and confirmed the importance of Paenibacillus and Gemmatimonadetes to biomass deconstruction. These studies also indicate that there are unexplored proteins with important roles in bacterial lignocellulose deconstruction.« less
  • Highlights: • Microbial community dynamics and process functional resilience were investigated. • The threshold of TAN in mesophilic reactor was higher than the thermophilic reactor. • The recoverable archaeal community dynamic sustained the process resilience. • Methanosarcina was more sensitive than Methanoculleus on ammonia inhibition. • TAN and FA effects the dynamic of hydrolytic and acidogenic bacteria obviously. - Abstract: While methane fermentation is considered as the most successful bioenergy treatment for chicken manure, the relationship between operational performance and the dynamic transition of archaeal and bacterial communities remains poorly understood. Two continuous stirred-tank reactors were investigated under thermophilic andmore » mesophilic conditions feeding with 10%TS. The tolerance of thermophilic reactor on total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) was found to be 8000 mg/L with free ammonia (FA) 2000 mg/L compared to 16,000 mg/L (FA1500 mg/L) of mesophilic reactor. Biomethane production was 0.29 L/gV S{sub in} in the steady stage and decreased following TAN increase. After serious inhibition, the mesophilic reactor was recovered successfully by dilution and washing stratagem compared to the unrecoverable of thermophilic reactor. The relationship between the microbial community structure, the bioreactor performance and inhibitors such as TAN, FA, and volatile fatty acid was evaluated by canonical correspondence analysis. The performance of methanogenic activity and substrate removal efficiency were changed significantly correlating with the community evenness and phylogenetic structure. The resilient archaeal community was found even after serious inhibition in both reactors. Obvious dynamics of bacterial communities were observed in acidogenic and hydrolytic functional bacteria following TAN variation in the different stages.« less