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Title: Investigation of thermochemical biorefinery sizing and environmental sustainability impacts for conventional supply system and distributed pre-processing supply system designs

Abstract

The 2011 US Billion-Ton Update estimates that by 2030 there will be enough agricultural and forest resources to sustainably provide at least one billion dry tons of biomass annually, enough to displace approximately 30% of the country's current petroleum consumption. A portion of these resources are inaccessible at current cost targets with conventional feedstock supply systems because of their remoteness or low yields. Reliable analyses and projections of US biofuels production depend on assumptions about the supply system and biorefinery capacity, which, in turn, depend upon economic value, feedstock logistics, and sustainability. A cross-functional team has examined combinations of advances in feedstock supply systems and biorefinery capacities with rigorous design information, improved crop yield and agronomic practices, and improved estimates of sustainable biomass availability. A previous report on biochemical refinery capacity noted that under advanced feedstock logistic supply systems that include depots and pre-processing operations there are cost advantages that support larger biorefineries up to 10 000 DMT/day facilities compared to the smaller 2000 DMT/day facilities. This report focuses on analyzing conventional versus advanced depot biomass supply systems for a thermochemical conversion and refinery sizing based on woody biomass. The results of this analysis demonstrate that the economies of scalemore » enabled by advanced logistics offsets much of the added logistics costs from additional depot processing and transportation, resulting in a small overall increase to the minimum ethanol selling price compared to the conventional logistic supply system. While the overall costs do increase slightly for the advanced logistic supply systems, the ability to mitigate moisture and ash in the system will improve the storage and conversion processes. In addition, being able to draw on feedstocks from further distances will decrease the risk of biomass supply to the conversion facility.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1149034
Report Number(s):
INL/JOU-14-32764
Journal ID: ISSN 1932-104X
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biofuels, Bioproducts & Biorefining; Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; biofuel; biorefinery size; cost analysis; thermochemical conversion

Citation Formats

David J. Muth, Jr., Matthew H. Langholtz, Eric C. D. Tan, Jacob J. Jacobson, Amy Schwab, May M. Wu, Andrew Argo, Craig C. Brandt, Kara G. Cafferty, Yi-Wen Chiu, Abhijit Dutta, Laurence M. Eaton, and Erin M. Searcy. Investigation of thermochemical biorefinery sizing and environmental sustainability impacts for conventional supply system and distributed pre-processing supply system designs. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1002/bbb.1483.
David J. Muth, Jr., Matthew H. Langholtz, Eric C. D. Tan, Jacob J. Jacobson, Amy Schwab, May M. Wu, Andrew Argo, Craig C. Brandt, Kara G. Cafferty, Yi-Wen Chiu, Abhijit Dutta, Laurence M. Eaton, & Erin M. Searcy. Investigation of thermochemical biorefinery sizing and environmental sustainability impacts for conventional supply system and distributed pre-processing supply system designs. United States. doi:10.1002/bbb.1483.
David J. Muth, Jr., Matthew H. Langholtz, Eric C. D. Tan, Jacob J. Jacobson, Amy Schwab, May M. Wu, Andrew Argo, Craig C. Brandt, Kara G. Cafferty, Yi-Wen Chiu, Abhijit Dutta, Laurence M. Eaton, and Erin M. Searcy. Fri . "Investigation of thermochemical biorefinery sizing and environmental sustainability impacts for conventional supply system and distributed pre-processing supply system designs". United States. doi:10.1002/bbb.1483.
@article{osti_1149034,
title = {Investigation of thermochemical biorefinery sizing and environmental sustainability impacts for conventional supply system and distributed pre-processing supply system designs},
author = {David J. Muth, Jr. and Matthew H. Langholtz and Eric C. D. Tan and Jacob J. Jacobson and Amy Schwab and May M. Wu and Andrew Argo and Craig C. Brandt and Kara G. Cafferty and Yi-Wen Chiu and Abhijit Dutta and Laurence M. Eaton and Erin M. Searcy},
abstractNote = {The 2011 US Billion-Ton Update estimates that by 2030 there will be enough agricultural and forest resources to sustainably provide at least one billion dry tons of biomass annually, enough to displace approximately 30% of the country's current petroleum consumption. A portion of these resources are inaccessible at current cost targets with conventional feedstock supply systems because of their remoteness or low yields. Reliable analyses and projections of US biofuels production depend on assumptions about the supply system and biorefinery capacity, which, in turn, depend upon economic value, feedstock logistics, and sustainability. A cross-functional team has examined combinations of advances in feedstock supply systems and biorefinery capacities with rigorous design information, improved crop yield and agronomic practices, and improved estimates of sustainable biomass availability. A previous report on biochemical refinery capacity noted that under advanced feedstock logistic supply systems that include depots and pre-processing operations there are cost advantages that support larger biorefineries up to 10 000 DMT/day facilities compared to the smaller 2000 DMT/day facilities. This report focuses on analyzing conventional versus advanced depot biomass supply systems for a thermochemical conversion and refinery sizing based on woody biomass. The results of this analysis demonstrate that the economies of scale enabled by advanced logistics offsets much of the added logistics costs from additional depot processing and transportation, resulting in a small overall increase to the minimum ethanol selling price compared to the conventional logistic supply system. While the overall costs do increase slightly for the advanced logistic supply systems, the ability to mitigate moisture and ash in the system will improve the storage and conversion processes. In addition, being able to draw on feedstocks from further distances will decrease the risk of biomass supply to the conversion facility.},
doi = {10.1002/bbb.1483},
journal = {Biofuels, Bioproducts & Biorefining},
number = 4,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}