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Title: Tungsten-Filled Silicone Composites for Moderating Proton Radiation Effects in Electronics.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1148416
Report Number(s):
SAND2007-2458J
523501
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci.; Related Information: Proposed for publication in IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci..
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Lenhart, Joseph L., Schroeder, John Lee., Dodd, Paul E., Schwank, James R., Shaneyfelt, Marty R, Felix, James Andrew, J. Baggio, P. Paillet, V.Rerlet-Cavrois, S. Girard, and E. W. Blackmore. Tungsten-Filled Silicone Composites for Moderating Proton Radiation Effects in Electronics.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Lenhart, Joseph L., Schroeder, John Lee., Dodd, Paul E., Schwank, James R., Shaneyfelt, Marty R, Felix, James Andrew, J. Baggio, P. Paillet, V.Rerlet-Cavrois, S. Girard, & E. W. Blackmore. Tungsten-Filled Silicone Composites for Moderating Proton Radiation Effects in Electronics.. United States.
Lenhart, Joseph L., Schroeder, John Lee., Dodd, Paul E., Schwank, James R., Shaneyfelt, Marty R, Felix, James Andrew, J. Baggio, P. Paillet, V.Rerlet-Cavrois, S. Girard, and E. W. Blackmore. Sun . "Tungsten-Filled Silicone Composites for Moderating Proton Radiation Effects in Electronics.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1148416,
title = {Tungsten-Filled Silicone Composites for Moderating Proton Radiation Effects in Electronics.},
author = {Lenhart, Joseph L. and Schroeder, John Lee. and Dodd, Paul E. and Schwank, James R. and Shaneyfelt, Marty R and Felix, James Andrew and J. Baggio and P. Paillet and V.Rerlet-Cavrois and S. Girard and E. W. Blackmore},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci.},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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