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Title: Power MOSFET Degradation in Space Radiation Environments.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1137318
Report Number(s):
SAND2007-2077C
523842
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the 2007 IEEE Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects Conference held July 23-27, 2007 in Honolulu, HI.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Felix, James Andrew, Shaneyfelt, Marty R, Schwank, James R., Dodd, Paul E., Witcher, Joseph Brandon, Dalton, Scott M., and Dalton, Scott M. Power MOSFET Degradation in Space Radiation Environments.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Felix, James Andrew, Shaneyfelt, Marty R, Schwank, James R., Dodd, Paul E., Witcher, Joseph Brandon, Dalton, Scott M., & Dalton, Scott M. Power MOSFET Degradation in Space Radiation Environments.. United States.
Felix, James Andrew, Shaneyfelt, Marty R, Schwank, James R., Dodd, Paul E., Witcher, Joseph Brandon, Dalton, Scott M., and Dalton, Scott M. Sun . "Power MOSFET Degradation in Space Radiation Environments.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1137318.
@article{osti_1137318,
title = {Power MOSFET Degradation in Space Radiation Environments.},
author = {Felix, James Andrew and Shaneyfelt, Marty R and Schwank, James R. and Dodd, Paul E. and Witcher, Joseph Brandon and Dalton, Scott M. and Dalton, Scott M.},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • Abstract not provided.
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