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Title: CHEMICAL SIGNATURES FOR SUPERHEAVY ELEMENTARY PARTICLES

Abstract

Models of dynamical symmetry breaking suggest the existence of many particles in the 10 GeV to 100 TeV mass range. Among these may be charged particles, X{sup ±}, which are stable or nearly so. The X{sup +}'s would form superheavy hydrogen, while the X{sup -}'s would bind to nuclei. Chemical isolation of naturally occurring technetium, promethium, actinium, protactinium, neptunium or americium would indicate the presence of superheavy particles in the forms RuX{sup -}, SmX{sup -}, {sup 232}ThX{sup -}, {sup 235, 236, 238}UX{sup -}, {sup 244}PuX{sup -}, or {sup 247}CmX{sup -}. Other substances worth searching for include superheavy elements with the chemical properties of B, F, Mn, Be, Sc, V, Li, Ne, and Tl.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Computing Sciences Directorate; Physics Division
OSTI Identifier:
1134727
Report Number(s):
LBL-12010
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS

Citation Formats

Cahn, Robert N., and Glashow, Sheldon L. CHEMICAL SIGNATURES FOR SUPERHEAVY ELEMENTARY PARTICLES. United States: N. p., 1980. Web. doi:10.2172/1134727.
Cahn, Robert N., & Glashow, Sheldon L. CHEMICAL SIGNATURES FOR SUPERHEAVY ELEMENTARY PARTICLES. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1134727
Cahn, Robert N., and Glashow, Sheldon L. 1980. "CHEMICAL SIGNATURES FOR SUPERHEAVY ELEMENTARY PARTICLES". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1134727. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1134727.
@article{osti_1134727,
title = {CHEMICAL SIGNATURES FOR SUPERHEAVY ELEMENTARY PARTICLES},
author = {Cahn, Robert N. and Glashow, Sheldon L.},
abstractNote = {Models of dynamical symmetry breaking suggest the existence of many particles in the 10 GeV to 100 TeV mass range. Among these may be charged particles, X{sup ±}, which are stable or nearly so. The X{sup +}'s would form superheavy hydrogen, while the X{sup -}'s would bind to nuclei. Chemical isolation of naturally occurring technetium, promethium, actinium, protactinium, neptunium or americium would indicate the presence of superheavy particles in the forms RuX{sup -}, SmX{sup -}, {sup 232}ThX{sup -}, {sup 235, 236, 238}UX{sup -}, {sup 244}PuX{sup -}, or {sup 247}CmX{sup -}. Other substances worth searching for include superheavy elements with the chemical properties of B, F, Mn, Be, Sc, V, Li, Ne, and Tl.},
doi = {10.2172/1134727},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1134727}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1980},
month = {12}
}