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Title: Window taper functions for subaperture processing

Abstract

It is well known that the spectrum of a signal can be calculated with a Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT), where best resolution is achieved by processing the entire data set. However, in some situations it is advantageous to use a staged approach, where data is first processed within subapertures, and the results are then combined and further processed to a final result. An artifact of this approach is the creation of grating lobes in the final response. The nature of the grating lobes, including their amplitude and spacing, is an artifact of window taper functions, subaperture offsets, and subaperture processing parameters. We assess these factors and exemplify their effects.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1121978
Report Number(s):
SAND2013-10619
492708
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING

Citation Formats

Doerry, Armin Walter. Window taper functions for subaperture processing. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.2172/1121978.
Doerry, Armin Walter. Window taper functions for subaperture processing. United States. doi:10.2172/1121978.
Doerry, Armin Walter. 2013. "Window taper functions for subaperture processing". United States. doi:10.2172/1121978. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1121978.
@article{osti_1121978,
title = {Window taper functions for subaperture processing},
author = {Doerry, Armin Walter},
abstractNote = {It is well known that the spectrum of a signal can be calculated with a Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT), where best resolution is achieved by processing the entire data set. However, in some situations it is advantageous to use a staged approach, where data is first processed within subapertures, and the results are then combined and further processed to a final result. An artifact of this approach is the creation of grating lobes in the final response. The nature of the grating lobes, including their amplitude and spacing, is an artifact of window taper functions, subaperture offsets, and subaperture processing parameters. We assess these factors and exemplify their effects.},
doi = {10.2172/1121978},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2013,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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