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Title: Genesis Eco Systems, Inc. soil washing process

Abstract

The Genesis soil washing system is an integrated system of modular design allowing for maximum material handling capabilities, with optimized use of space for site mobility. The Surfactant Activated Bio-enhanced Remediation Equipment-Generation 1 (SABRE-1, Patent Applied For) modification was developed specifically for removing petroleum byproducts from contaminated soils. Scientifically formulated surfactants, introduced by high pressure spray nozzles, displace the contaminant from the surface of the soil particles into the process solution. Once the contaminant is dispersed into the liquid fraction of the process, it is either mechanically removed, chemically oxidized, or biologically oxidized. The contaminated process water is pumped through the Genesis Biosep (Patent Applied For) filtration system where the fines portion is flocculated, and the contaminant-rich liquid portion is combined with an activated mixture of nutrients and carefully selected bacteria to decompose the hydrocarbon fraction. The treated soil and dewatered fines are transferred to a bermed stockpile where bioremediation continues during drying. The process water is reclaimed, filtered, and recycled within the system.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
110249
Report Number(s):
UCRL-ID-119210
ON: DE95017056; TRN: 95:021951
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 11 Oct 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; 29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; SOILS; WASHING; HYDROCARBONS; REMOVAL; REMEDIAL ACTION; TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER; BIODEGRADATION

Citation Formats

Cena, R.J. Genesis Eco Systems, Inc. soil washing process. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.2172/110249.
Cena, R.J. Genesis Eco Systems, Inc. soil washing process. United States. doi:10.2172/110249.
Cena, R.J. Tue . "Genesis Eco Systems, Inc. soil washing process". United States. doi:10.2172/110249. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/110249.
@article{osti_110249,
title = {Genesis Eco Systems, Inc. soil washing process},
author = {Cena, R.J.},
abstractNote = {The Genesis soil washing system is an integrated system of modular design allowing for maximum material handling capabilities, with optimized use of space for site mobility. The Surfactant Activated Bio-enhanced Remediation Equipment-Generation 1 (SABRE-1, Patent Applied For) modification was developed specifically for removing petroleum byproducts from contaminated soils. Scientifically formulated surfactants, introduced by high pressure spray nozzles, displace the contaminant from the surface of the soil particles into the process solution. Once the contaminant is dispersed into the liquid fraction of the process, it is either mechanically removed, chemically oxidized, or biologically oxidized. The contaminated process water is pumped through the Genesis Biosep (Patent Applied For) filtration system where the fines portion is flocculated, and the contaminant-rich liquid portion is combined with an activated mixture of nutrients and carefully selected bacteria to decompose the hydrocarbon fraction. The treated soil and dewatered fines are transferred to a bermed stockpile where bioremediation continues during drying. The process water is reclaimed, filtered, and recycled within the system.},
doi = {10.2172/110249},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Oct 11 00:00:00 EDT 1994},
month = {Tue Oct 11 00:00:00 EDT 1994}
}

Technical Report:

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