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Title: MREG V1.1 : a multi-scale image registration algorithm for SAR applications.

Abstract

MREG V1.1 is the sixth generation SAR image registration algorithm developed by the Signal Processing&Technology Department for Synthetic Aperture Radar applications. Like its predecessor algorithm REGI, it employs a powerful iterative multi-scale paradigm to achieve the competing goals of sub-pixel registration accuracy and the ability to handle large initial offsets. Since it is not model based, it allows for high fidelity tracking of spatially varying terrain-induced misregistration. Since it does not rely on image domain phase, it is equally adept at coherent and noncoherent image registration. This document provides a brief history of the registration processors developed by Dept. 5962 leading up to MREG V1.1, a full description of the signal processing steps involved in the algorithm, and a user's manual with application specific recommendations for CCD, TwoColor MultiView, and SAR stereoscopy.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1095930
Report Number(s):
SAND2013-6567
463755
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Eichel, Paul H. MREG V1.1 : a multi-scale image registration algorithm for SAR applications.. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.2172/1095930.
Eichel, Paul H. MREG V1.1 : a multi-scale image registration algorithm for SAR applications.. United States. doi:10.2172/1095930.
Eichel, Paul H. 2013. "MREG V1.1 : a multi-scale image registration algorithm for SAR applications.". United States. doi:10.2172/1095930. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1095930.
@article{osti_1095930,
title = {MREG V1.1 : a multi-scale image registration algorithm for SAR applications.},
author = {Eichel, Paul H.},
abstractNote = {MREG V1.1 is the sixth generation SAR image registration algorithm developed by the Signal Processing&Technology Department for Synthetic Aperture Radar applications. Like its predecessor algorithm REGI, it employs a powerful iterative multi-scale paradigm to achieve the competing goals of sub-pixel registration accuracy and the ability to handle large initial offsets. Since it is not model based, it allows for high fidelity tracking of spatially varying terrain-induced misregistration. Since it does not rely on image domain phase, it is equally adept at coherent and noncoherent image registration. This document provides a brief history of the registration processors developed by Dept. 5962 leading up to MREG V1.1, a full description of the signal processing steps involved in the algorithm, and a user's manual with application specific recommendations for CCD, TwoColor MultiView, and SAR stereoscopy.},
doi = {10.2172/1095930},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2013,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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