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Title: Earth curvature and atmospheric refraction effects on radar signal propagation.

Abstract

The earth isnt flat, and radar beams dont travel straight. This becomes more noticeable as range increases, particularly at shallow depression/grazing angles. This report explores models for characterizing this behavior.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1088060
Report Number(s):
SAND2012-10690
456405
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Doerry, Armin Walter. Earth curvature and atmospheric refraction effects on radar signal propagation.. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.2172/1088060.
Doerry, Armin Walter. Earth curvature and atmospheric refraction effects on radar signal propagation.. United States. doi:10.2172/1088060.
Doerry, Armin Walter. Tue . "Earth curvature and atmospheric refraction effects on radar signal propagation.". United States. doi:10.2172/1088060. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1088060.
@article{osti_1088060,
title = {Earth curvature and atmospheric refraction effects on radar signal propagation.},
author = {Doerry, Armin Walter},
abstractNote = {The earth isnt flat, and radar beams dont travel straight. This becomes more noticeable as range increases, particularly at shallow depression/grazing angles. This report explores models for characterizing this behavior.},
doi = {10.2172/1088060},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2013},
month = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2013}
}

Technical Report:

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