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Title: A study of grout flow pattern analysis

Abstract

A new disposal unit, designated as Salt Disposal Unit no. 6 (SDU6), is being designed for support of site accelerated closure goals and salt nuclear waste projections identified in the new Liquid Waste System plan. The unit is cylindrical disposal vault of 380 ft diameter and 43 ft in height, and it has about 30 million gallons of capacity. Primary objective was to develop the computational model and to perform the evaluations for the flow patterns of grout material in SDU6 as function of elevation of grout discharge port, and slurry rheology. A Bingham plastic model was basically used to represent the grout flow behavior. A two-phase modeling approach was taken to achieve the objective. This approach assumes that the air-grout interface determines the shape of the accumulation mound. The results of this study were used to develop the design guidelines for the discharge ports of the Saltstone feed materials in the SDU6 facility. The focusing areas of the modeling study are to estimate the domain size of the grout materials radially spread on the facility floor under the baseline modeling conditions, to perform the sensitivity analysis with respect to the baseline design and operating conditions such as elevation ofmore » discharge port, discharge pipe diameter, and grout properties, and to determine the changes in grout density as it is related to grout drop height. An axi-symmetric two-phase modeling method was used for computational efficiency. Based on the nominal design and operating conditions, a transient computational approach was taken to compute flow fields mainly driven by pumping inertia and natural gravity. Detailed solution methodology and analysis results are discussed here.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Savannah River National Lab., Aiken, SC (United States)
  2. Mercer Univ., Macon, GA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
1084439
Report Number(s):
SRNL-STI-2013-00010
TRN: US1300142
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC09-08SR22470
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ANS 2013 Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA (United States), 16-20 Jun 2013
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES

Citation Formats

Lee, S. Y., and Hyun, S. A study of grout flow pattern analysis. United States: N. p., 2013. Web.
Lee, S. Y., & Hyun, S. A study of grout flow pattern analysis. United States.
Lee, S. Y., and Hyun, S. Thu . "A study of grout flow pattern analysis". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1084439.
@article{osti_1084439,
title = {A study of grout flow pattern analysis},
author = {Lee, S. Y. and Hyun, S.},
abstractNote = {A new disposal unit, designated as Salt Disposal Unit no. 6 (SDU6), is being designed for support of site accelerated closure goals and salt nuclear waste projections identified in the new Liquid Waste System plan. The unit is cylindrical disposal vault of 380 ft diameter and 43 ft in height, and it has about 30 million gallons of capacity. Primary objective was to develop the computational model and to perform the evaluations for the flow patterns of grout material in SDU6 as function of elevation of grout discharge port, and slurry rheology. A Bingham plastic model was basically used to represent the grout flow behavior. A two-phase modeling approach was taken to achieve the objective. This approach assumes that the air-grout interface determines the shape of the accumulation mound. The results of this study were used to develop the design guidelines for the discharge ports of the Saltstone feed materials in the SDU6 facility. The focusing areas of the modeling study are to estimate the domain size of the grout materials radially spread on the facility floor under the baseline modeling conditions, to perform the sensitivity analysis with respect to the baseline design and operating conditions such as elevation of discharge port, discharge pipe diameter, and grout properties, and to determine the changes in grout density as it is related to grout drop height. An axi-symmetric two-phase modeling method was used for computational efficiency. Based on the nominal design and operating conditions, a transient computational approach was taken to compute flow fields mainly driven by pumping inertia and natural gravity. Detailed solution methodology and analysis results are discussed here.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 10 00:00:00 EST 2013},
month = {Thu Jan 10 00:00:00 EST 2013}
}

Conference:
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  • Waste disposal is rapidly becoming one of the most important technological endeavors of the authors time, and fixation of waste in cement-based materials is an important part of the endeavor. Investigations of given wastes are usually individually conducted and reported. In this study, data obtained from investigation of critical flow rates for three distinctly different wastes are correlated with apparent viscosity data via a single empirical equation. Critical flow rate, which is an important variable in waste grout work, is defined as the flow rate at which a grout must be pumped through a reference pipe to obtain turbulent flow.more » It is important that the grout flow be turbulent, since laminar flow allows caking on pipe walls and causes eventual plugging. The three wastes used in this study can be characterized as containing (a) high nitrate, carbonate, and sulfate; (b) high phosphate; and (c) high fluoride, ammonium, an suspended solids waste.« less
  • The Saltstone Facility, located within the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina, consists of two facility segments: The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The SPF receives decontaminated legacy low level sodium salt waste solution that is a byproduct of prior nuclear material processing. The salt solution is mixed with cementitious materials to form a grout slurry known as “Saltstone”. The grout is pumped to the SDF where it is placed in a Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) to solidify. SDU 6 is referred to as a “mega vault” and is currently in the designmore » stage. The conceptual design for SDU 6 is a single cell, cylindrical geometry approximately 114.3 meters in diameter by 13.1 meter high and is larger than previous cylindrical SDU designs, 45.7 meters in diameter by 7.01 meters high (30 million gallons versus 2.9 million gallons of capacity). Saltstone slurry will be pumped into the new waste disposal unit through roof openings at a projected flow rate of about 34.1 cubic meters per hour. Nine roof openings are included in the design to discharge material into the SDU with an estimated grout pour radius of 22.9 to 24.4 meters and initial drop height of 13.1 meters. The conceptual design for the new SDU does not include partitions to limit the pour radius of the grout slurry during placement other than introducing material from different pour points. This paper addresses two technical issues associated with the larger diameter of SDU 6; saltstone flow distance in a tank 114.3 meters in diameter and quality of the grout. A long-radius flow test scaled to match the velocity of an advancing grout front was designed to address these technology gaps. The emphasis of the test was to quantify the flow distance and to collect samples to evaluate cured properties including compressive strength, porosity, density, and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Two clean cap surrogate mixes (saltstone premix plus water) were designed to simulate slurry with the reference saltstone rheology and a saltstone with extra water from the process flushing operation. Long-radius flow tests were run using approximately 4.6 cubic meters of each of these mixes. In both tests the pump rate was 0.063 liters/second (1 gpm). A higher pump rate, 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm), was used in a third long-radius flow test. The angle of repose of the grout wedges increased as a function of time in all three tests. The final angles of repose were measured at 3.0º, 2.4º, and 0.72º. The pump rate had the largest effect on the radial flow distance and slope of the grout surface. The slope on the pour placed at 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm) was most representative of the slope on the grout currently being pumped into SDU 2 which is estimated to be 0.7º to 0.9º. The final grout heights at 1/3 of a meter from the discharge point were 115, 105, and 38 cm. Entrapped air (≥ 0.25 cm bubbles) was also observed in all of the mixes. The entrapped air appeared to be released from the flows within about 3.1 meters (10 feet) of the discharge point. The bleed water was clear but had a thin layer of floating particulates. The bleed water should be retrievable by a drain water collection system in SDU 6 assuming the system does not get clogged. Layering was observed and was attributed to intervals when the hopper was being cleaned. Heat from the hydration reactions was noticeable to the touch.« less
  • Waste disposal is rapidly becoming one of the most important technological endeavors of our time and fixation of waste in cement-based materials is an important part of the endeavor. Investigations of given wastes are usually individually conducted and reported. In this study, data obtained from investigation of critical flow rates for three distinctly different wastes are correlated with apparent viscosity data via a single empirical equation. Critical flow rate, which is an important variable in waste grout work, is defined as the flow rate at which a grout must be pumped through a reference pipe to obtain turbulent flow. Itmore » is important that the grout flow be turbulent since laminar flow allows caking on pipe walls and causes eventual plugging. The three wastes used in this study can be characterized as containing: (1) high nitrate, carbonate, and sulfate; (2) high phosphate; and (3) high fluoride, ammonium, and suspended solids waste. The measurements of apparent viscosity (grouts are non-Newtonian fluids) and other measurements to obtain data to calculate the critical flow rates were made using a Fann-Direct Reading Viscometer, Model 35A.« less