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Title: Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

Abstract

Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
AMES (Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1082322
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; RECYCLING; RARE; EARTH; METALS; NEODYMIUM

Citation Formats

Ryan Ott. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling. United States: N. p., 2012. Web.
Ryan Ott. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling. United States.
Ryan Ott. 2012. "Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1082322.
@article{osti_1082322,
title = {Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling},
author = {Ryan Ott},
abstractNote = {Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2012,
month = 9
}
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